Category Archives: Television

Production Designer Alex Craig’s Extraordinary Creative Vision

English production designer Alex Craig is one of the leading proponents of his craft. Well known to UK television audiences through a sterling roster of credits, from his contributions to the avidly watched BBC National Lottery and A Question of Sport and runaway reality smash This Time Next Year, Craig has perfected a mixture of bold creativity and context sensitive design that’s made him one of the most in-demand talents in the business.

Craig arrived at his position through a somewhat circuitous route; he initially studied fine arts at a series of prestigious schools when fate intervened. “A good friend at art school was training to direct film in the Media Studies department,” Craig said. “And he told me about the role of the art director in film and TV and that immediately  interested me. My initial experience was working on music videos and fashion shows, which I loved, so it just grew from there and I became hooked. A Fine Art degree isn’t the most obvious route into production design, but in my case, it was.”

In short order, Craig established himself as a reliably creative professional with a peerless instinct for creating solid, appealing design

“Throughout my career, I’ve been lucky enough to have worked on a wide range of interesting and well known UK and international productions,” Craig said. “Many of these required a variety of studio and location work in the UK, China and Spain  Large scale entertainment shows are definitely a favorite of mine, and I’m a big music fan, so l welcome the opportunity to get involved in designing tours for bands and solo artists. As a personal project, I’d also like to experiment with some of the LED technology that is commonplace in studio design and apply it to create innovative bespoke pieces for interiors. Variety definitely keeps my designs fresh.”

One of Craig’s biggest and most challenging assignments has been as lead production designer for BBC1 TV’s long-running, start-studded annual fundraising spectacular Children in Need for almost a full decade.  Since its 1980 launch, CIN has raised 600 million British pounds for disabled children and young people, established itself as a prominent staple of British pop culture and featured many of world’s most famous entertainers—from Taylor Swift and Madonna to Rod Stewart and One Direction.

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“The show producers approached me in 2006,” Craig said. “They wanted to bring the CIN set up to date—it was beginning to look a bit old fashioned. They were impressed by my designs, as I’d been production designer on a number of high-profile BBC shows, and they thought it would be a good fit. I jumped at the opportunity.”

It was formidable job. “The telethon is a live, 7 hour primetime broadcast,” Craig said. “It features numerous ‘A list’ acts from the worlds of pop, musicals, comedy, dance, plus surprise performances. For the most part, these take place on a very large, impressive main stage. But the set also requires areas for presenters, surprise guests and more intimate performances so the set design also includes additional stages, a catwalk, multiple entrance options, several huge LED screens, plus a large studio audience. “

As a fully live, in-the-moment theatrical presentation, Craig has to not only anticipate myriad potential complications, he must be prepared to confront any issue head on. “The set also has to be flexible enough to get specific ‘performance sets’ required by any given artist, onto and off the main stage at high speed. It’s a technically complex event, which requires a mixture of creativity, logistics and a calm nature—especially when there’s less than a minute to go till the next spot and I can see an incomplete performance set still being put together on the stage.  Back in 2006 there was also a large orchestra to accommodate, and although the orchestra is now gone, the amount of technology has increased which brings its own challenges.”

“There’s a creative pressure to design a set that is going to have the style and presence to work as an appropriate backing for a diverse mix of some of the world’s biggest stars,’ Craig said. “The fact that it is live requires a lot of quick turnaround scenic setting, striking and re-setting throughout the 7 hours that we’re live on air. Backstage can become extremely cramped, with props, scenery and band equipment stacked everywhere you look. The set also incorporates a huge amount of LED technology which has to be integrated into the scenery as the set is installed. This can sometimes slow us down if there’s any kind of fault or glitch.”

Few have the drive, vision and skill to take on such monumental task, year after year, but Craig wouldn’t have it any other way. Nor would the BBC: “Alex designed the main studio set for 9 Children in Need shows, which is an outstanding achievement in itself,” executive producer Clare Pizey said. “He is an innovative and extremely talented Production Designer who has managed to give the show a visual identity which sets the tone for the night. And he is always pushing to move the look of the set to the next level, which both uplifts and inspires the audience. This is much of the reason why Children in Need has become so special to British culture as a whole.”

Craig’s long stint with CIN is one of the crown jewels in his already glittering resume, and it holds a special place in the designer’s affections.

“I love designing this show and am proud of what it stands for,” Craig said. “It has become a very special annual event in my work diary and a career highlight for me. It’s an honor to have contributed to such a good cause for so many years.  The show has raised record amounts of money even during recession years, and that always spurs me on to dream up new ways of presenting a fresher, more innovative design.”

For more information on Alex Craig, visit alexcraig.com

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Katie Horbury works with Hollywood’s A-listers during BAFTA Awards

Katie Horbury says it is her job to bring ideas to life. As a producer, she takes in every aspect of the production and ensures it all runs smoothly. Without her, the television shows you know and love may not have made it to the screen. She takes on a lot of responsibility, but she loves what she does.

Originally from Pontefract in the North of England, Horbury broke from the norm. She wanted more than a quiet life in a small town, and became determined to do what she loves most: telling stories. She left for the big city when she could, and immediately started working with some of her country’s most iconic shows, such as The Only Way is Essex, Big Brother and Celebrity Big Brother, Celebs Go Dating, Don’t Tell the Bride, and Come Dine with Me. She has worked with ITV, the second largest network in the UK, as well as Disney Channel. There is no limit to what she can do.

I like telling stories and creating something that has a reaction in other people. Whether they are laughing, crying, learning something or just entertained in some way, knowing that I created an emotional response in another person is what I love doing. I love the night before a shoot when I can’t sleep because I have that nervous excitement in my stomach. I love waking up at 5 a.m. on filming days and running on adrenaline all day because your creative juices are flowing, and this is me at my best. What I love the most though, is the first few days in the edit, when it all starts coming together and you begin to see your vision come to life,” said Horbury.

While living her dream, Horbury has the opportunity to work alongside Britain’s best. Perhaps this is best represented with her work on the BAFTA Film and BAFTA TV Awards. BAFTA, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, hosts the two prominent award shows every year, honoring Britain’s film and television stars. Horbury grew up watching the award shows, inspired by the actors, directors, and especially producers that won the awards. When she was given the opportunity to then work on the award shows, she was eager to take part in the new experience.

“Working there was a completely new and different experience to any other show I had ever worked on. This was a hugely prestigious event and it is essential that everything runs smoothly,” said Horbury.

Having worked on the award shows every year since 2011, Horbury has many responsibilities, ensuring the shows go off without a hitch. She assists presenters like Stephen Fry and Graham Norton with full rehearsals. She also manages the event timings to ensure that all chaperones and their A-list citations readers are fully rehearsed, their scripts are finalized and they are backstage promptly on time to present their award, and that they go to press and are interviewed and photographed with the award winner.

Essentially, Horbury ensures that everyone is in the right place at the right time, making her essential for the live awards ceremony. Some of these talents include A-list actors such as Leonardo Dicaprio, Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Emma Stone and Meryl Streep. The ceremony also hosted royals Prince and Princess William and Kate.

“Working on this show is insane. The pressure is like nothing else I have ever experienced,” said Horbury. “I decide to go back every year because I love being part of such a celebration of British film and television, and British Culture.”

Horbury is repeatedly asked to come back to the awards shows, as her talents are imperative to the shows’ success. Initially, a fellow producer had recommended Horbury for the role, knowing that someone with a lot of skill and commitment was needed. She now works with the same team every year. In 2011, Horbury made sure one presenter was back stage at the correct time. Since then, she has been promoted and ensures every single presenter is where they need to be. Without her, there would be no one to present the awards, and fellow producer Matthew Edmondson, who worked with Horbury on the BAFTA Awards, was extremely impressed.

Working with Katie is always a pleasure and a rewarding experience. She’s hard working, easy to work with and she brings high quality production values to the productions she works on. I would love to work with her again.  Katie is an honest, trusted and experienced producer who has very high standards. She is fantastic with people which makes contributors and crew respect her. Katie is extremely well organized, confident and imaginative. She never gets flustered and never and never gives up and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend her for future jobs no matter how big or small the production is,” said Edmondson.

While Horbury has ample experience in television, the BAFTA Awards are the only award show she has been a part of. The foundations are the same, and she remains cool, calm, collected, and professional during the award shows, as she does with each project she takes on. However, she allows herself a moment to fully appreciate the event each year.

“It is such a beautifully presented event that celebrates the most amazing film and TV productions. While the show day itself is incredibly challenging, I am so proud to be part of something that rewards the most talented people in the world when it come to my greatest passion – story telling. This is the night when you see real emotion, pride and honor in those people who are rewarded for telling exceptionally moving, honest and often heartbreaking stories through Film and TV production,” concluded Horbury.

Q&A with leading Canadian actor Darren Eisnor

Originally from a small town in Ontario, Canada, Darren Eisnor did not grow up aspiring to be an actor. It came to him suddenly, in an epiphany of sorts, and since that moment, he has never wanted anything else. Now, he is one of Canada’s top young actors, and he is quickly taking the globe by storm.

In many captivating performances, such as the films Holiday Joy and Early Release, as well as the acclaimed television show Anne with an E, Eisnor has gained fans from all over the world., and audiences are looking forward to his performance in the upcoming Syfy horror flick Never Knock. Currently, he is starring in the popular Blackpills series Skal, an enthralling story about the water disappearing across the planet overnight. To read more about the series, Eisnor’s career, and his life, check out the interview below!

IFR: What do you like about being an actor?

 DE: I get to be super cool. When people ask me what I do, and I say that I’m an actor as a career, they automatically assume I’m a cool guy. So that’s pretty cool. Really though, if you can get some lucky breaks and manage to carve a career out of the whole thespian thing, it is a ton of fun and incredibly liberating in a few ways. I’m the kind of guy who bounces around from friend group to friend group, and I’m always diving headfirst into new interests, as I like to keep things fresh and experience as much as possible in this life. Acting meshes rather well with that state of mind, because I get to become all sorts of different people in all sorts of different lives, and if I convince the right people that I’m really like those people – then I get paid for it!

It can be a great life experience for me to look at the world through all these different perspectives, even if it’s just for an audition or two and I don’t end up getting the part. We humans are such interesting and multi-faceted creatures, but I don’t think everyone gets the chance or has the courage to explore all their dimensions. Of course, there are some dark and dangerous sides to us as well, that are probably best left for the actors (and the Mixed Martial Artists). It really is a privilege to even have the opportunity to compete for all these roles that I go out for, and I am grateful for that.

When I first started training as an actor, it actually helped me in a therapeutic way. I didn’t realize how many emotional walls I had built up over the years, and I think this is especially prevalent among young men, and even more so for young men like me who were competitive athletes for most of their life. I actually think there is a fair argument for the building of these walls, because life is almost always very hard to tackle, and the battlefield of life can be easier to navigate if you are able to have a firm grip on your emotions. However, acting is a forum for the human condition to express itself, and to be successful and great at this profession, it seems to me that one must truly elevate emotional intelligence to a higher level of understanding and vulnerability.

IFR: Why did you want to work on Skal?

DE: Skal piqued my interest with its post-apocalyptic world, something that’s fascinated me in stories like The Walking Dead, or the Fallout video game series. At first, I auditioned for the role of Arthur, the outright leading role of the series. Arthur is a bit of a nerd, but he’s charismatic enough to operate a YouTube channel with three million subscribers. I submitted a tape that I really nailed down in terms of performance, and was really excited. The scenes they requested for the audition helped a lot in that regard, ranging from comical and cool, to raging and teary-eyed. I got a callback for it – but for the role of “Ylane”, which was a soon-to be-changed French name from the original French short film the series is based on. The character is Arthur’s best friend and manager, and an integral character within the series.

My agent set up a Skype session with the writer/director who is from France, Benjamin Cappelletti, who explained to me that my original audition was great, but I didn’t look enough like his vision of Arthur. He went on to say that I looked like a great “Ylane.” Luckily, I was able to flesh out this character into someone with some dark humanity, and they casted me! They even renamed the character “Darren” which was pretty cool, since I’m not sure if I’ll get the chance to play my own name again.

IFR: What was it like working on Skal?

DE: Working on Skal was an outstanding career experience for me. Living in Montreal for about a month during this shoot really made me feel a sense of independence. Of course, it came with the great responsibility of carrying a lot of the burden of the show’s success on my shoulders, which was more than welcome on my end. This was exactly what I’d be looking forward to, and I wasn’t about to back down now that it was staring me down.

Darren was an interesting character to play. In the first episode, before the apocalyptic world is born, Darren is a bit of an arrogant showman, talking all sorts of big game to the hottest girls in the room. That said, he felt relatively happy and content in his materialistic world. But when all the bodies of water in the world dry up, he immediately adapts a “kill or be killed” mindset. While it’s easy to condemn that sort of regression, it’s easy for me to understand why someone would fall into that way of thinking in that sort of world. Although there are times when it seems Darren is being overly aggressive, often it’s hard to disagree with his sentiment in a world where you can’t trust anyone, or take any chances.

Every villain is a hero in the story of their mind, and that’s how I took ownership of Darren when he makes decisions that may seem wrong on the surface. There is one particular part of the series where I wish Darren were a little more heroic, but I remained entirely understanding of his motive of self-preservation. I think there’s also an automatic connection with a character when he has the same name as you – and when the other characters address me as “Darren” there is an added element of personalization.

I also tried to get into character for one particular series of events by going without food for a day or so. It was definitely tough turning down lunch that day on set, but at least the last meal I had before all that was a delicious all-you-can-eat sushi brunch!

IFR: What was your character like?

DE: The role of Darren is important to the story, firstly as Arthur’s best friend and Emma’s romantic interest. There’s an awkward love triangle going on where Arthur lusts for Emma, but never makes any moves on her. Darren is far from low on confidence, so him and Emma have been going at it for a while, and it really irritates Arthur – even after all the water dries up, and the apocalypse creeps on in. After survival mode kicks in, Darren and Emma clash often. Emma has an empathetic desire to help as many people as she can, but Darren understands that there is too much danger to risk the group, especially after they come across a huge stash of water bottles that could keep them alive long enough to figure out what the hell’s going on in the world.

The group runs into two other people named Frank (a police officer) and Malika (a nurse). Frank misleads the group when he comes into first contact with them, and Darren never trusts him again after that. There are many fiery exchanges while they try to escape the dangerous city, but as the season crosses the halfway point, tragedy strikes, and the pack is split up. Darren becomes a prisoner of a violent gang of brutal men. With his life fully in jeopardy, his every action has extremely high weight to it. In season two, I think I will be exploring an even darker side of Darren if we keep the fun rolling.

IFR: What was it like working with such an all-star cast?

DE: It’s important for there to be a good chemistry between cast members, especially when a group forms in the show and your characters spend a lot of time interacting with each other. Everyone got along really well, and really put their best foot forward with their performances in Skal.

In terms of performance, it was superb. Evan Marsh (who plays Arthur) was a consistent rock in the center of the production, and there’s one particularly powerful scene where we really pushed each other to emotional peaks. Oliva Scriven (Emma) managed to tolerate an intense make out scene with me, so kudos to her for that. She’s very popular on social media for her role on Degrassi, so it was nice to have her bring some viewers on board with that. Trevor Hayes (Frank) and Mariah Inger (Malika) were playing characters that “Darren” viewed as outsiders, and didn’t trust, and there were some great heated interactions between us on screen – especially Frank, the hard-nosed cop who doesn’t take too kindly to Darren’s big mouth.

Shawn Baichoo played a late-season villain named Pablo, who is a leader of a violent gang. I only got to work with him for a short period of time, but he really brought his A-game and played a convincing madman. They gave him a contact lens that made it look like he had a white “dead eye”, which added to the aura of evil. We had some intense scenes that he totally owned and showed a possession of confident power. I should also mention that little Chelsea Goldwater, who played a young child prisoner, helped add to the creepiness of the scenes.

This project was Benjamin Cappelletti’s “baby”. He’d been pushing this story for a while as a young filmmaker in France, and it was great to help bring his vision to life. His passion for Skal was evident, and even though there were a few moments of language barriers, we were able to communicate together and get the scenes done to his satisfaction.

IFR: The series premieres on the streaming app Blackpills. How do you think streaming websites have opened the doors for actors such as yourself?

DE: Well, obviously there is more opportunity than ever for an actor with all these new avenues of distribution. In the past, films were limited to festivals and cinema, while television series were limited to cable and satellite subscriptions. Now there are all sorts of streaming avenues out there for episodic series and films alike, and the opportunity to get quality productions made has never been greater.

I’m very grateful for the opportunity to have a leading role in Skal, and it will be interesting to see how Blackpills performs overall as a company. It seems they are aiming to get a firm grip on the mobile-streaming game, as their app is currently only available for mobile devices as opposed to TVs. I haven’t had the chance to observe many of the other shows on their app, but they have already granted out several second season renewals for some of them, so there is certainly a chance for us to get back at it. At the very least, the show is of high-quality and makes for solid demo footage to show other productions what I can do with a meaty role.

Blackpills also stands out with the brevity of each of their shows’ episodes; the average runtime for an episode of Skal was about nine minutes long. Today’s generation operate very much from an extreme lack of attention span, so this format is designed quite well with that in mind. Here’s hoping it works out!

Canada’s Cassie Friedman found intriguing stories for Global TV

Cassie Friedman says being a producer is synonymous with being a storyteller. Sometimes she will become bogged down with logistics – coordinating schedules, booking locations, finding potential characters, etc. But when all those pieces come together, she is telling a story. As a producer, she ensures every part of a production is in order, and at the same time finds the most compelling stories to keep her audience engaged.

Now, Friedman is an internationally sought-after development producer, working with the independent production company Studio Lambert in both London and Los Angeles. Before that, however, she was working with one of Canada’s largest broadcasters, Global Television. Not only did she help produce The Morning Show, The News at Noon, and the station’s ‘Child Safety Awareness Week’, but she also greatly contributed to various other newsroom projects.

“Global is one of the major networks in Canada and I’d been watching Channel 3 my whole life. Global’s reputation was already top tier for me. It was a no-brainer for me to try to start my career there,” said Friedman.

Global Television is a privately-owned, Canadian English-language broadcast television network, now owned by Corus Entertainment. Friedman worked on many projects for the network, like the bi-weekly Making a Difference segment, the Ontario General Election in 2011 and covering Canada’s National Ballet School’s Assemblee Internationale in 2013. Her responsibilities included researching, shot listing, booking stories, and assisting cameramen on shoots.

The Global Toronto Newsroom was always abuzz and working there always felt like you were right where the action was. I was always driven to do my absolute best, because I was surrounded by the best journalists in one of Canada’s most respected newsrooms. So, I took extra care working on major projects. I used my research skills to tell a great story and ensure there were no errors,” she said.

Friedman’s contributions were essential to the newsroom’s success on a daily basis. During her time there, Global News won the 2013 Edward R. Murrow award for Overall News Excellence in Network Television, and Global Toronto won four RTDNA Edward R. Murrow awards in 2013, including the Bert Cannings Award – Best Newscast. For Friedman, the acclaim was absolutely fantastic.

“I always felt so lucky to be part of such an iconic, respected newsroom and working with a smart, committed team. It was so rewarding to be recognized for all the hard work we all put in day in and day out. I don’t think any of us did it for the recognition, so to be acknowledged, it definitely made me feel more appreciated. And confident that what we were doing was having an impact,” she said.

For a large part of her time at Global news, Friedman worked on anchor Susan Hay’s Making a Difference segment, where Hay would showcase inspiring people in the community who were doing charitable acts and helping others. Hay had been at Global for more than 20 years, and served as an inspiration for a 21-year-old Friedman. Friedman booked shoots, worked in the field and helped with scripts. On one occasion, when Friedman thought she may not find a story in time, she found out about a woman in the community who offered yoga programs for the elderly, and it ended up being one of the show’s best segments.

“What makes Cassie incredible to work with is her positive attitude. That goes a long way in the news industry. She was always full of energy, ideas, and willing to help. Her determination and passion for creativity has placed her where she is today – which is far ahead of many of her peers,” said Susan Hay, TV Host and Journalist.

Working on the show also allowed Friedman to discover new passions. While covering the provincial election, she found she had an affinity for politics. She looked at every riding, who might win, who’d won previously, which ridings swung in the federal election. She ended up choosing two Conservative and two Liberal locations. She also had to choose one for the New Democratic Party, and chose a seemingly random riding north of Toronto because it had swung NDP in the federal election. Her instincts proved fruitful.

“After lots of research, I had a feeling it would swing NDP again. I sent our cameras to the NDP candidate’s event, and low and behold, that candidate won and had a huge celebration with music and dancing. It made for great television and showcased a community that had never really been seen before. It was very exciting and what I took away from it was that digging deep into research pays off,” said Friedman.

There is no doubt that Friedman is an extraordinary producer, with natural instincts and a complete commitment to her craft. She will continue to bring success to whatever she works on, and audiences will enjoy watching her do it.

Actor Konstadinos Lahanas does own stunt work in popular TV show ‘The Disappearance’

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Konstadinos Lahanas

Performing has always been Konstadinos Lahanas passion. He feels as if he was meant to be an actor, and audiences around the world could not agree more. His versatility is consistently evident, seamlessly transitioning from dramatic to comedic roles throughout his career. He has emerged as one of Greece’s leading actors, and has no plans on slowing down.

Throughout his career, Lahanas has worked on a series of successful projects, whether it be film, television, commercials, or stage plays. His work in series like Family Stories (Oikogeneiakes Istories), and I Have a Secret (Eho Ena Mystiko), the film The Pilgrim (O Proskinitis), and a popular Yoplait commercial shown all over Europe has made him instantly identifiable. One of his most well-known performances was on the hit television show The Disappearance (I Exafanisi).

“I wanted to work on this hit series for many reasons.  It was considered a big production for Greek standards and something that hadn’t been done before.  The action sequences were one of a kind for this production and the director, Stratos Markidis, had a great reputation for the way he worked on set and he was on the top of my list of directors of whom I wished to work with,” said Lahanas.

The Disappearance was a popular two-season, drama-action television series distributed on Greek Television by Alpha TV. The series was directed by Stratos Markidis, starring with Natalia Dragoumi and Stavros Zalmas. The story describes the life of a happy couple, Fillipos and Alex, who are married for 17 years and have two children. When Fillipos gets promoted, the family decides to celebrate with a journey in Tinisia. In the airport there, Alex sees Mauro for the first time, a mysterious Greek-Italian doctor. After this meeting, the life of this triangle changes dramatically once Alex get lost in a local Bazaar. Then the adventure begins, as Fillipos tries desperately to find Alex in a foreign and hostile country.

“The show involves family matters, which we all hold close to our hearts. The anxiety and turmoil a family is put through when faced with such an incident is heartbreaking. Relationships and bonds within the family are tested in moments like these and often are a make it or break it factor. As humans, we can all relate to this and I feel this is what makes the story important,” said Lahanas.

In The Disappearance, Lahanas plays a young and ambitious police officer, actively participating in the chase of Mauro who had abducted Alex. The requirements of this role were demanding, requiring lots of running and combat skills, as well as successful expression of intense emotions during the scenes. The character is essential in the story development, as the police officer helps to solve the disappearance that the show is based off of.

“What I really liked about working on this project was how physically demanding the role was and how intense the emotions ran through my body, allowing me to commit to my character as needed. All of this allowed me to expand my horizons as an actor. Working on this production was extremely interesting as all the filming was done outdoors, and all the cast and crew were tested by the circumstances we had to work with, heat being a number one factor and of course all the stunts involved,” Lahanas described.

The role of the police officer required a lot of stunt work that Lahanas did himself. The character actively participated in chasing down the main suspect and finally resolving the case with success. This meant Lahanas needed to be trained in combat and stunt driving.

“Working on this production was an amazing experience. Acquiring such skills that I hadn’t had the chance to work on before and really enjoyed doing. There were times were my limits were tested on set as some shots were extremely dangerous and it was up to me to decide whether or not I wanted to take the risk. Being put in this situation helped me shape the character I wanted to portray,” he described.

These shots were risky. While filming one crucial scene in an abandoned house during the night, one of the floorboards where Lahanas was walking suddenly collapsed. Luckily, he was able to grab onto the remaining floor to prevent a serious injury, but he was still hurt. However, he did not let this interfere with his portrayal of the police officer, something that impressed all who he worked with.

“I worked with Konstadinos on The Disappearance and was immediately impressed by him. His acting skills during difficult and demanding action scenes were magnificent. I think that the biggest strengths of Konstadinos are his dedication to the needs of every role and also his ability to improvise,” said co-star Natalia Dragoumi.

Lahanas became a part of this project after the casting agent contacted him. They knew they needed someone talented that could also handle the physical demands of the role. Lahanas was the immediate choice, and once he read the script, he was hooked.

“I was immediately inspired by the high intensity of the role and all the stunts involved in the action sequences. Doing my own stunts was something I always wanted to experience as an actor,” he said.

There is little doubt as to why, with such extraordinary talent, Lahanas is such a successful and acclaimed actor, and audiences can expect to continue to see him on both their big and small screen for years to come.

 

Jing Wen talks becoming a web phenomenon

Jing Wen
Jing Wen

When Jing Wen sits to envision how to begin working on a new project, every fibre of her being comes to life. She is addicted to the power she experiences when she witnesses her audience feeling her story. From the very first take, she knows what she wants them to see and she commits herself to ensuring that every single step is taken with care to do her ideas justice. For the renowned director, her work allows her to be free to express herself and her opinions before the world in a way few other professions allow. It is a job unlike any other and her passion for her work is unprecedented.

For as long as Wen can remember, storytelling has been her calling and she has done so for the better of every project she has ever embarked on. In her work on films like Blossoming Flowers and Golden Eagle Festival, Wen has taken the inner workings of her mind and shared them with her audience in the most raw, authentic way possible. She is a natural connector, knowing all of the intricate roles involved in bringing a film to life and ensuring that each and every person she works with knows exactly what they need to do to help carry the film to greatness. When a problem arises, she knows exactly what to do and she makes sure that her co-workers are at ease and confident in their roles at all times.

Wen’s leadership skills are unparalleled and they have been instrumental to her success as a director. In 2016, she was tasked with re-vamping the Chinese reality show, Mom is Superman 1. The show’s producer, Baili Yuan, sought Wen’s help in the midst of a struggle to change the direction of the show after its first season. Yuan knew that the script needed the perspective of a director like Wen. Someone who had the creative edge to keep their audience fully engaged and eagerly anticipating each new episode. Yuan also knew that it needed a natural born leader. It required a skilled director who could talk the stars through their roles and establish attainable targets. To Yuan’s satisfaction, Wen agreed to share her talents with Yuan’s team and presented her vision for Mom is Superman 2.

The result was astounding. Wen far exceeded any expectations that Yuan had for her. The wildly successful web series received 1.4 million viewers online and became a Topic Discussion online over 3.2 billion times. Unsurprisingly, Mom is Superman 2 won Macau International Advertising Festival’s “2016-17 Best Program of China” award and Wen is without a doubt the reason why.

Wen’s satisfaction, however, came from the chance she seized to use her talents for the better of her viewers. She got to do what she loves more than anything else. She got to tell stories. “What I love about directing is story telling. It is the most essential part of any film. As a director, the way in which you choose to tell your story is crucial. I want my audience to feel amazed when they watch my films. More importantly, I want them to find meaning in the stories I tell,” said Wen.

Mom is superman 2 poster 2
Mom is Superman 2 poster

The challenge, for Wen, is that making her films often involves the assistance of a sponsor. She knows how difficult it can be when a sponsor pushes her to accept their advice and their suggestions. Her vast experience in the industry, however, allows her to overcome this obstacle each time she is presented with it. She is passionate about her work and she understands the need to stay true to her original ideas. In order to do so, she has grasped the ability to liaise effortlessly with her sponsors and ensure that any compromises she makes wont jeopardize the integrity of the film. Her professionalism is one of the many reasons that sponsors and producers are eager to work with her at any chance they get. Mom is Superman 2’s producer, Yuan is a prime example. Having worked with Wen on several occasions, Yuan continues to return to her whenever she is looking for a high quality director who can help take her projects to the next level.

“I first met Jing when she was a graduate but I haven’t forgotten her since. She is so full of curiosity and she thrives in a variety of situations. She is such a creative director and her experience makes her an asset on any project. She knows how to handle any emergency we encounter on set,” told Yuan.

After achieving such acclaim for Mom is Superman 2, Wen has already set her sights on an even bigger, brighter outcome for Mom is Superman 3. Every time she finishes a project, she is already thinking about the next best thing she can bring to the screen. This is because directing is a lifestyle for Wen and storytelling is her artistry. It isn’t something she can shut off, and why would she? She is fortunate enough to be able to do what she loves and to be great at what she does. She lives every artist’s dream on a daily basis and she does not plan on stopping any time soon.

Television Host Dan Babic strives to be in the one percent

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Dan Babic on set

Working in a field as gruelling as the entertainment industry is no small feat. Where most individuals see a daunting career path, plagued by unstable income and fierce competition, Australian entertainer Dan Babic has only ever seen a breadth of opportunity. It has never been about a steady pay check, or a permanent “nine to five,” but rather about embracing the unknown and the diversity of challenges that entertaining unveils. When most parents ask their child about what they’d like to be when they grow up, they often expect to hear answers like “famous entertainer” and simply hope that the novelty will wear off with age. This, however, was not the case for Babic’s mother and father, as his unwavering desire to entertain has only grown stronger over the years.

 

“Less than one per cent of the world’s entire population are at the top of the entertainment industry. So, if you want to be part of the one per cent, you have to be prepared to do what only one per cent of people can do,” notes Babic. Unsurprisingly, he is prepared to do just that and more. His relentless desire to share his talents with the world push him to test his own limits and to bring the unique elements of his personality to the industry in ways that other television personalities haven’t before. The result is a seemingly effortless combination of humour and realism that flavour his work in a unique way that one can only truly understand by witnessing him in action. The success that this up-and-coming entertainer has achieved so early on in his career is a result of his natural affinity for entertainment and his drive to showcase himself as an authentic television personality.

In 2016, when Babic was approached to host Fashion One’s Design Genius, Babic couldn’t resist accepting. The series centres around a “fashion-packed” competition that challenges fashion designers to create original and inventive clothing and accessories. A show of this nature requires an effective host. A host who isn’t afraid to challenge its competitors, but who also has the capacity to empathize with the designers and capitalize on the genuine moments that a testing competition orchestrates.

“I wanted to work on Design Genius, as the success the show relied entirely on the host’s ability to captivate, engage and connect a culturally diverse audience of over 400 million people from 173 countries. I wanted to showcase my ability of to unifying individuals of all different backgrounds. The show sought a distinctive, unique personality to host and I knew this is something I have to offer. I knew that I would be an asset to the project. It required a host with the rare skill set needed to take the audience on a journey from beginning, through the middle, to the end in an improvisational, yet precise fashion. This isn’t something that every television personality is able to do, but it is the exact hosting style that I thrive in and so I knew from the start that I was the only person for the job. What’s more, is that I had always dreamed of working with the show’s producer, Tone Innset,” tells Babic.

Fortunately, the reputation that Babic has established for himself presents him as a top tier television host and personality. When producers or directors are searching for a host, his name comes to mind almost instantaneously. Innset’s knowledge of Babic’s talents made her eager to work with the entertainer and Design Genuis’ viewers reaped the benefits.

“Mr. Babic performed the leading role of host for the series Design Genius, where he garnered a substantial amount of praise for himself and the series. In his leading role, his responsibilities required him to complete a number of tasks, including introducing the series, the contestants, and their projects for each and every episode. His larger than life personality allowed him to attract audiences to the show simply by listening to him or watching him, as his exciting interactions with his co-hosts and contestants were often unconventional in the approach, confronting aggressive contestants, or heartily joking and laughing with his fellow hosts and judges. It is imperative for a host to have such a personality, and to utilize their skillsets as a performer to convey this to the audience. In addition to the typical duties of a host, he was also responsible for leading the show as a judge, and he decided which contestants advanced to the subsequent rounds, which contestants were eliminated, and which contestants broke the rules and must be disqualified. Dan has a unique ability to command attention from his audience and the other contestants, as well as his other judges, highlighting his domineering on screen personality, which translates into increased viewership for the series as a whole,” says Innset.

The show’s wide reach is a testament to Babic’s mastery of television hosting and flawless ability to captivate his audience. What’s most impressive, however, is Babic’s ability to remain humble in his rise of fame. In the wake of praise, Babic remains true to himself. “What I like most about being an on-camera personality is that it feels like home. It completely lights me up in every way possible. When I’m hosting a television show, I feel an overwhelming sense of comfort in knowing that I am doing exactly what I am meant to do. The pure joy it brings me extends to all aspects of my life and helps me become the best version of myself that I can be. Words cannot describe how much I love and live for what I do and I am beyond grateful that I get to experience that every single day with my work. It is such a rare thing and I never forget that but I know that my success comes from my persistence, my fearlessness, my hard work and by simply trusting my intuition,” Babic states.

Babic’s talents as an entertainer are unparalleled. Television show creators would be hard-pressed to find a host more dynamic and at ease in front of the camera than him. He was born to be on screen and anyone who has seen his work knows that great things are in store for his future audiences.