Tag Archives: Photographer

Small Humans Seen through the Eyes of Master Photographer Lisa Tichané 

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Shot by Lisa Tichané 

No matter what emotional state you’re in, it’s nearly impossible to look at a child playing freely or a baby giggling without incurring a little dose of second hand joy. If you’re in need of a boost, but there’s a lack of small humans around to marvel at, a surefire way to tap back into the whimsical and playful nature of life is to look at photos of babies and children doing what they do best, playing.

Capturing children and babies in their natural, fun loving state has been a lifelong passion for advertising photographer Lisa Tichané. “If you need a little more joy in your life (don’t we all?), then look no further than Lisa [Tichané’s] work. She infuses fun and happiness with every shutter click,” wrote Click Pro’s jurors when they named Lisa among the 100 Female photographers to Watch in 2020.

Lisa’s images stand out with an energy that is candid, magnetic and absorbing. Chances are you’ve seen her images on campaigns for some of the biggest international brands in baby and health care, such as Neutraderm, Physiolac, Bactidose from leading manufacturer Laboratoires Gilbert, MAM baby, Bimbies diapers and numerous others.

Last year Lisa shot the campaign for Laboratoires Gilbert’s Neutraderm, the company’s leading skincare brand, which specializes in sensitive skin for everyone from babies to adults. Considering that Neutraderm is a skincare product, the lighting for the campaign was integral, with the baby and the adult models needing to appear soft and flawless.

Lisa nailed the brief. The images, which are currently being used in both the web and print campaign, exude a delicate feeling of tenderness.

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Neutraderm Campaign shot by Lisa Tichané 

“We were seeking a very natural looking type of photography, showing families in their everyday life without artifice yet, with a subtle artistic touch and great light,” explains Laboratoires Gilbert Communication Manager Stéphanie Mottier. “What makes [Lisa’s] work unique is her refined style with emphasis on light. She is also very resourceful and a problem solver, even on very short notice. A great artist.”

While it’s not hard to fall in love with an image of a baby, capturing them in their element is no easy accomplishment. Aside from the understandable challenges of getting these tiny models to do what the client envisions for their campaign, there are limits on the amount of time a baby is legally allowed to be on a commercial shoot, which in France, is two hours. That means the photographer has to be ready at all times to get the shot.

Lisa explains, “When working with babies you have very little time to get what you want, between naps, meals and necessary breaks, the efficient time to shoot is incredibly short. You have to be perfectly ready to press the shutter at the right moment and nail every single shot because you usually don’t get a second chance to get the perfect expression if you have missed it the first time.”

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Neutraderm Campaign shot by Lisa Tichané 

Beyond the captivating lighting and quality of the shots, the intimacy reflected between the models in the Neutraderm images, who previously had never met, serves as an even deeper testament to Lisa’s talent for setting the perfect environment.

“She definitely has her way with children and knows how to get the best out of them with absolutely no pressure. Which is also a relief for parents. She is a great photographer,” explains Mottier.

Over the past decade Lisa’s career has skyrocketed, with her images being featured on the covers of the industry’s leading magazines, such as Click and Parents Magazine, as well as within the pages of French magazines such as Photo, Declic Photo and Competence Photo, Germany’s Photographie, Quebec’s Portraits d’Enfants and Korea’s MilKorea.

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Parents Magazine cover shot by Lisa Tichané 

While Lisa clearly has a creative eye, the unique skill set that she possesses in terms of being able to photograph babies and children is something that she honed at a young age. Growing up in Marseille, France, Lisa’s interest in photography commenced in middle school when her French teacher began holding a photography workshop during lunch breaks.

Lisa recalls, “I quickly discovered that I was a very lousy landscape photographer, however I was good at taking portraits of my friends and capturing true expressions and raw emotions. I was hooked.”

A few years later one of her teacher’s gave birth to a baby boy, a pivotal event that served as Lisa’s introduction to photographing babies and children.

She says, “I quickly became his favorite babysitter and practiced my new photography skills on this tiny model. It brought me so much joy that I quickly started photographing all the babies and kids in my environment. A passion was born… I never thought it would turn into a career, though.”

Those early years of shooting photos of Quentin, and the relationship she built with her first little model not only led Lisa to fall in love with photographing children, but it gave her the invaluable experience of practicing her craft in a natural environment. Not long after, Lisa was faced with the tragic passing of her mother, a loss that forever transformed the way she views photography.

An incredibly painful experience for someone of any age, but arguably more so for a 13 year old, Lisa was distraught to discover after her mother’s passing that there were no photos of them together, as her mom was always the one behind the camera.

“This painful gap made me realize that photography is so much more than a fun hobby, it’s also a powerful way to freeze time and preserve memories forever,” explains Lisa.

“Before I became an advertising photographer, my first call was to photograph families. I really wanted to make sure that all of the kids that crossed my path would have meaningful images of themselves with their moms and dads to cherish forever.”

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Lisa Tichané with her sons

In 2010 Lisa opened her photography studio Tout Petit Pixel a.k.a. Tiny Little Pixel, where she focused on shooting children and families; and she’s since shot photos for hundreds of families.

For Lisa, photography has been a lifelong practice imbued with passion and inspiration, but it didn’t culminate into a career path until later in her adult life. Perhaps it is the fact that she had to make such a great effort to leave behind a comfortable career in order to pursue what really made her tick, that makes her such a passionate and uniquely skilled artist.

After graduating business school Lisa went onto work as a product manager for Sara Lee, which placed her behind the scenes on advertising photo shoots and gave her expert insight into what clients are looking for.

“Seeing the advertising photography world from the client side is something that has deeply nurtured my work as a professional photographer later on,” explains Lisa. “It has made me more aware of the client’s point of view, understanding their needs and fear, thus creating the conditions for a better professional relationship with my clients.”

For an advertising photographer there is a lot riding on getting the perfect shot, something that becomes exponentially more difficult when one’s models aren’t known for their ability to take direction.

Lisa says, “The deep challenge of being an advertising kids photographer is creating the conditions for the brief to come to life while your little models aren’t even aware that they are following your rules.”

While others may struggle to get their little models into poses, the confidence and joy that Lisa brings to her work sets the stage for a smooth and carefree set– she knows she’s going to get the shot, so she’s not afraid to let her little subjects create their own rules and enjoy the experience.

Mottier says, “Her major strength is this very special connection with children. It is also a real gain of time during shootings as they feel very at ease with her. She knows how to capture special moments.”

While the majority of photographers avoid shooting babies and children at all costs, Lisa Tichané flocks to them with love. Though her subjects are by no means easy to shoot, her passion for capturing them is clear and you can see that carefree nature and joy overflowing from her photos.

“Kids nurture me, they feed my playful soul. I know they can feel how genuine my joy is when I am with them, and it helps them connect with me instantly… Another key factor is experience. By working exclusively with babies and kids I have gathered a ton of experience which is incredibly useful to be able to handle any kind of tricky situation, and believe me, there are always tricky situations during a baby shoot,” says Lisa.

“Years of experience and hundreds of shoots have given me enough skills and confidence to truly enjoy my work without being stressed out by the many challenges of the job.”

Lisa’s unparalleled talent coupled with her years of experience shooting her favorite little subjects have led her to be considered among the best photographers in her field; and she’s earned numerous awards that prove it. In recent years Lisa was chosen as the winner of PHOTO magazine’s prestigious 2016 photo contest, as well as a finalist in the 2014 to 2017 editions of the Voice International Photo Competition, and a finalist in the 2019 Medals of Professional Photography. She was also nominated as one of the Top 10 Lifestyle Photographers in the world by the International Lifestyle Photographers Association, in addition to earning prestigious awards from l’Eté des Portraits a.k.a. The Summer of Portraits, Europe’s largest outdoor portrait photography exhibition, which features over 1,000 images biennially.

When it comes to excelling in photography, Lisa says, “My main advice is to shoot only what you truly love, because this is how your work will shine. Although I have the technical knowledge to shoot nearly anything, if I photograph something that doesn’t make my heart beat, it shows… While photography requires lots of professional skills to succeed, strong and memorable images are created with your guts first. Follow your gut.”

Photographer Adam Flipp talks shooting in freezing Tasmanian conditions for ‘Australia’s Next Top Model’

As a fashion photographer, Adam Flipp captures feelings and energy with his viewers that communicate a message and act as aspirational for a consumer. He uses art to evoke commercialism, using his unique eye to capture visual masterpieces that many of the world’s largest companies then use to market their products and brands.

Flipp has made a name for himself in Australia as a celebrated fashion and portrait photographer, working with some of the world’s most recognizable brands. He has travelled the world doing what he loves, shooting for Hewlett Packard, Johnny Was, Magic Millions, Nike, and many more throughout his well-established career.

Throughout the years, Flipp has also shot for many high-fashion projects, including the tenth season of the iconic series Australia’s Next Top Model. Australia’s Next Top Model is the extremely popular Australian version of America’s Next Top Model, on which Flipp performed a leading and critical role as a photographer. Flipp was a photographer in the models’ screen test challenge. After this, he shot the models in a session at Cradle Mountain in Tasmania. These shoots prominently featuring Flipp aired on Episode 5 of Season 10, which aired on television in Australia, New Zealand, and throughout Asia featuring world-renowned model Gemma Ward. He worked closely with stylist Jessie Heart, who asked Flipp to join the team.

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photo by Adam Flipp

“Working in Tasmania was amazing and probably the coldest environment I’ve ever worked in. The grass crunched when you walked on it and seeing how determined the girls were to succeed in these punishing conditions was inspirational,” said Flipp.

Flipp has previously seen the show and aspired to be better than any of the other photographers they had. He had found previous seasons often had stiff photographers, and he didn’t want to come across as wooden and tight, because he knew it would make the aspiring models nervous. He therefore pretended that he wasn’t being filmed and focused on doing the job as if it was like any other fashion shoot he had conducted in his past.

“The location was amazing, and the crew were really cool. They were all true professionals,” he said.

The photoshoot challenge for Flipp’s episode was to send the girls into freezing cold conditions to model in swimwear and activewear. Therefore, Flipp had to get high results quickly, especially because the models were also inexperienced and had never been shot in these conditions before. Flipp managed to produce photos that captured the beauty of the freezing scenery and the essence of each model.

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Photo by Adam Flipp

When Flipp first looked at the models, he was worried that the season would not produce a model worthy of the opportunities that the finalist receives for winning the show. However, the moment Flipp put his camera on Aleyna Fitzgerald, he knew she was the winner. He found that immensely rewarding, helping launch the career of someone so deserving. For the photographer, it felt like destiny.

“I love the fact that the end result of the show is that one of the models gets given the chance of building a really successful modelling career. In this case it was Aleyna Fitzgerald,” Flipp concluded.

 

Written by John Michaels

Filmmaker Alice Esposito pays tribute to old school cinema with new film

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Poster for The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch

Alice Esposito sees life through the lens of a camera. Everywhere she looks, she knows exactly how an image could be framed perfectly, whether in a photograph or video. Her artistic instincts have been her fortitude throughout her career, and her determined work ethic sets her apart from the rest. There is little doubt as to why she is one of Italy’s best recent photographers and filmmakers.

While working on successful projects, such as Thend, Esposito has exemplified versatility and artistry. As both a filmmaker and a photographer, she is internationally sought after. Her work consistently tells a story in a beautiful way, which is exemplified by her film The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch.

The black and white silent comedy tells the story of a cynical, socially inept mime that lives a life of tiny distractions. Yet, even indulging in his smallest fantasies drives him to fits of rage and despair. A chance encounter with the woman of his reverie compels him into a series of humorously tragic attempts at wooing her. A romantic picnic, a windy walk on the beach, and multiple passes at capturing her beauty through art all backfire, with harrowing consequences.

“I feel like nowadays the stories are told so fast and full of action or sex that people do not have time for simplicity and realness anymore. With this movie, I wanted to stop time and let you live the moments with the main character, which is why some sequences of the movie are slightly slower than the normal parameters of cinema. I wanted to challenge the viewer to stay with me, to feel all these feelings that we usually escape from. There’s also a lack of technology and space/time that I wanted to use to give the audience this sense of peace, but with a little anxiety behind that. Technology made us impatient, and I wanted to analyze this concept. And love, this incredible feeling that keeps everything together; the expectation of love, its course, the ups and down, and the real and the fantasy,” Esposito described.

After premiering at The Prince of Prestige Film Festival where it was nominated for Best Short, Best Actor and Best Actress, The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch went on to tremendous success. It won the Festival Prince of Prestige Academy Award as Best Comedy (Comedy Gold).

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Phil Ristaino as the mime in The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch

“When the film first started having success, I was like ‘cool’, but after I began telling the cast and crew, it really hit me. This wasn’t the first time I won something, but it was the first time I won something where I worked with so many people and coordinated with them all together to create a project. It felt like all the family won and that everybody’s work was recognized. I was and still am so proud and grateful of them,” said Esposito.

Esposito’s idea for the film came from working with her friend and main actor in the film Phil Ristaino. Ristaino created character routines for fun, and his “Bad Luck Mime” stood out to Esposito. The two decided to make a movie that would be a tribute to the origin of cinema. Having already worked together on the film Dinamicity, which saw similar success, they were eager to work together again.

Working with Alice is very collaborative. Alice is an extremely enthusiastic director. She gets caught up in whatever idea has currently caught her fancy and will talk at great length about all the ideas she has for a particular story. Often, she will call me about a project she wants to make and tell me about some visual or story ideas, and these conversations will usually result in us meeting up to discuss the next project and see if it appeals to us both. We are both very visual people, and her ideas will spark images in my own mind, and vice versa,” said Ristaino.

Esposito was the producer, writer, and director of the film, and therefore greatly responsible for its success. She wanted to make the perfect film, and thought of every last detail. Half of the post-production took place in Italy, and the other half in California. Normally, coordinating this would be immensely difficult, but Esposito’s management capabilities are exceptional.

Location scouting was also vital for the production, and this turned out to be one of Esposito’s favorite parts of filming. She was able to discover different parts of Los Angeles, like Eagle Rock and Griffith Park, Malibu, and Echo Park. Her love for the setting overcame any challenges that come from working outside, like wind and natural light. In order to film like this, a filmmaker must be fast and precise, characteristics that Esposito embodies.

She also wanted to find the perfect team to take charge. She knew how important the music would be in a silent film, and therefore found not just composer, but two, Simone Anichini and Davide Alberto Centolani.

“A big part of making this movie this successful I think was to have the right people around me. It all always comes down to the talents you work with. I learned a lot about delegating and asking for want I needed. I was able to put all the pieces of production together and have exactly what I wanted. Many of the things were planned ahead, but you need to be ready for something not working out and be able to go around it. The secret is to be always ready to change and compromise but never give up,” she advised.

The last piece of the puzzle for the filmmaker was the title. She wanted something that would encapsulate her film. It was when she remembered that in Italian, a mockingbird is also called “the mime” that she realized she had a title.

“I remember I was in the car with Phil and we started to throw titles around, it was hilarious,” she described. “The mockingbird is known to mimic the songs of other birds and the sounds of insects, and this is how it started to come together. Being in love is like being above every physical experience I know, but at the same time when you heart gets broken the impact to the ground is hard. You could say the title represents this feeling but with a tragic romanticism with a pinch of irony in it. I think we got it right!”

That they did. Keep an eye out for Esposito’s work. With talent like hers, we can expect to keep seeing her name for quite some time.

Watch The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch here.

Top photo by Unknown

Photographer Jennifer Roberts creates visual masterpieces for ‘The Globe and Mail’

From the time Jennifer Roberts was a child, she was always artistic. Originally from the small town of Port Hope, Ontario, she would travel to Toronto with her parents to visit art galleries and cultural events. Even then, at a young age, she was captivated, and understood the power that it was to create something beautiful. It was only natural for her to want to do the same, and that is when she found her way to photography. Now, she is an internationally celebrated photographer.

Roberts is a renowned editorial photographer who specializes in portraiture and documentary stories, and also does work for commercial clients. Her documentary style works well for newspapers while my more produced portraiture work fits in magazines. She truly loves what she does, and everyone she works with impressed with her talents.

“I’ve commissioned Jennifer on various shoots for Maclean’s magazine over the last two years. She is an outstanding photographer and my go-to for any high-profile portrait or reportage assignments. I fully trust her professionalism and ability to give the magazine what it needs on every shoot we give her,” said Sarah Palmer, Contributing Photo Editor Maclean’s Magazine.

In addition to Maclean’s, Roberts has shown not only Canada, but the world what she is capable of with her work in The Wall Street Journal, as well as Canadian Business, MoneySense Magazine, and Getty, including her work for the 2016 International Film Festival, photographing Oscar-nominated actors. Her success has been outstanding, and she believes her career truly began when she started working for The Globe and Mail back in 2008.

“Working with one of Canada’s largest newspapers is exciting. Some of my favourite Canadian photographers are regular contributors to The Globe so it feels great to be in such fantastic company. The Globe photo editors provide a helpful amount of direction so I know what type of photography they need for their story. However, they also leave lots of room for the photographer to be creative and bring their story telling abilities to the shoots. Shoots for The Globe are often for really interesting national and international stories that I’m very proud to work on,” said Roberts.

Initially, Roberts was hired by The Globe and Mail for a four-month summer contract. Before this, she shot a documentary photo project about refugees in Myanmar living in Thailand, which highly impressed the newspaper, and they wanted her to join their team. She relocated to Vancouver, British Columbia for the job. When she completed my contract, she moved back to Toronto, but the newspaper didn’t want to let her go, and kept her very busy with freelance work. She has been shooting for them ever since.

“I feel lucky that even when my placement was over I was given regular assignments with The Globe. Being a regular contributor is very exciting as it leads to so many diverse projects. The Globe work has allowed me to shoot a variety of celebrities, to shoot major news events, to shoot beautiful interiors, amazing food and restaurants and meet so many different people for portrait shoots. Working as an editorial photographer means every day is different. I feel like I have the best job in the world,” she said. “Working as a freelance photographer for The Globe and Mail is always interesting. I started my career there doing a lot of news stories but I now tend to shoot more food, lifestyle and portrait work. I make decisions about how to frame and light things based on what the story is and conceptually what makes the most sense. It’s important to always be true to the story you’re telling. Sometimes what makes the best picture isn’t the best way of telling the story and telling a true story is always the most important,” she described.

Since that time, Roberts has done a variety or large and important projects for the paper, where her photography was essential to the project. She did a large portrait of “Project of Women” during the March on Washington, in Washington DC. on January 21, 2017, something that she considers the highlight of her career. It started as an Instagram story but because the portraits were so successful they ended up running on A1 (the cover) of the newspaper and as a massive two-page spread in the interior of the paper.

“It was an amazing time to be in Washington and meeting and photographing all the women out demonstrating was so powerful,” said Roberts.

Roberts has done many more projects for the paper. She recently shot celebrities like -Recent Actress Kate Mara, Actor Stephan James, and Novelist Lawrence Hill, known for The Book of Negroes. She regularly shoots many features, including “My Favourite Room” for the Style Section, as well as business portraits, portraits for the news section, and a weekly shoot for restaurant reviews for the Saturday Edition, the largest edition of the paper.

“I enjoy the pace of this work and the process of being able to conceptualize and light the scenes. I like how working with The Globe is always different and always interesting. One day I might be shooting a story for the Style section about a beautiful living room and the next day it might be a CEO in their office. I like how every day and every shoot is a new chance to be creative and think of innovative and true ways to best tell a story,” said Roberts.

Readers of The Globe and Mail can keep an eye out for the visual masterpieces that are Roberts’ photos.