Category Archives: Photographers

Photographer Adam Flipp talks shooting in freezing Tasmanian conditions for ‘Australia’s Next Top Model’

As a fashion photographer, Adam Flipp captures feelings and energy with his viewers that communicate a message and act as aspirational for a consumer. He uses art to evoke commercialism, using his unique eye to capture visual masterpieces that many of the world’s largest companies then use to market their products and brands.

Flipp has made a name for himself in Australia as a celebrated fashion and portrait photographer, working with some of the world’s most recognizable brands. He has travelled the world doing what he loves, shooting for Hewlett Packard, Johnny Was, Magic Millions, Nike, and many more throughout his well-established career.

Throughout the years, Flipp has also shot for many high-fashion projects, including the tenth season of the iconic series Australia’s Next Top Model. Australia’s Next Top Model is the extremely popular Australian version of America’s Next Top Model, on which Flipp performed a leading and critical role as a photographer. Flipp was a photographer in the models’ screen test challenge. After this, he shot the models in a session at Cradle Mountain in Tasmania. These shoots prominently featuring Flipp aired on Episode 5 of Season 10, which aired on television in Australia, New Zealand, and throughout Asia featuring world-renowned model Gemma Ward. He worked closely with stylist Jessie Heart, who asked Flipp to join the team.

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photo by Adam Flipp

“Working in Tasmania was amazing and probably the coldest environment I’ve ever worked in. The grass crunched when you walked on it and seeing how determined the girls were to succeed in these punishing conditions was inspirational,” said Flipp.

Flipp has previously seen the show and aspired to be better than any of the other photographers they had. He had found previous seasons often had stiff photographers, and he didn’t want to come across as wooden and tight, because he knew it would make the aspiring models nervous. He therefore pretended that he wasn’t being filmed and focused on doing the job as if it was like any other fashion shoot he had conducted in his past.

“The location was amazing, and the crew were really cool. They were all true professionals,” he said.

The photoshoot challenge for Flipp’s episode was to send the girls into freezing cold conditions to model in swimwear and activewear. Therefore, Flipp had to get high results quickly, especially because the models were also inexperienced and had never been shot in these conditions before. Flipp managed to produce photos that captured the beauty of the freezing scenery and the essence of each model.

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Photo by Adam Flipp

When Flipp first looked at the models, he was worried that the season would not produce a model worthy of the opportunities that the finalist receives for winning the show. However, the moment Flipp put his camera on Aleyna Fitzgerald, he knew she was the winner. He found that immensely rewarding, helping launch the career of someone so deserving. For the photographer, it felt like destiny.

“I love the fact that the end result of the show is that one of the models gets given the chance of building a really successful modelling career. In this case it was Aleyna Fitzgerald,” Flipp concluded.

 

Written by John Michaels

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Filmmaker Alice Esposito pays tribute to old school cinema with new film

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Poster for The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch

Alice Esposito sees life through the lens of a camera. Everywhere she looks, she knows exactly how an image could be framed perfectly, whether in a photograph or video. Her artistic instincts have been her fortitude throughout her career, and her determined work ethic sets her apart from the rest. There is little doubt as to why she is one of Italy’s best recent photographers and filmmakers.

While working on successful projects, such as Thend, Esposito has exemplified versatility and artistry. As both a filmmaker and a photographer, she is internationally sought after. Her work consistently tells a story in a beautiful way, which is exemplified by her film The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch.

The black and white silent comedy tells the story of a cynical, socially inept mime that lives a life of tiny distractions. Yet, even indulging in his smallest fantasies drives him to fits of rage and despair. A chance encounter with the woman of his reverie compels him into a series of humorously tragic attempts at wooing her. A romantic picnic, a windy walk on the beach, and multiple passes at capturing her beauty through art all backfire, with harrowing consequences.

“I feel like nowadays the stories are told so fast and full of action or sex that people do not have time for simplicity and realness anymore. With this movie, I wanted to stop time and let you live the moments with the main character, which is why some sequences of the movie are slightly slower than the normal parameters of cinema. I wanted to challenge the viewer to stay with me, to feel all these feelings that we usually escape from. There’s also a lack of technology and space/time that I wanted to use to give the audience this sense of peace, but with a little anxiety behind that. Technology made us impatient, and I wanted to analyze this concept. And love, this incredible feeling that keeps everything together; the expectation of love, its course, the ups and down, and the real and the fantasy,” Esposito described.

After premiering at The Prince of Prestige Film Festival where it was nominated for Best Short, Best Actor and Best Actress, The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch went on to tremendous success. It won the Festival Prince of Prestige Academy Award as Best Comedy (Comedy Gold).

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Phil Ristaino as the mime in The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch

“When the film first started having success, I was like ‘cool’, but after I began telling the cast and crew, it really hit me. This wasn’t the first time I won something, but it was the first time I won something where I worked with so many people and coordinated with them all together to create a project. It felt like all the family won and that everybody’s work was recognized. I was and still am so proud and grateful of them,” said Esposito.

Esposito’s idea for the film came from working with her friend and main actor in the film Phil Ristaino. Ristaino created character routines for fun, and his “Bad Luck Mime” stood out to Esposito. The two decided to make a movie that would be a tribute to the origin of cinema. Having already worked together on the film Dinamicity, which saw similar success, they were eager to work together again.

Working with Alice is very collaborative. Alice is an extremely enthusiastic director. She gets caught up in whatever idea has currently caught her fancy and will talk at great length about all the ideas she has for a particular story. Often, she will call me about a project she wants to make and tell me about some visual or story ideas, and these conversations will usually result in us meeting up to discuss the next project and see if it appeals to us both. We are both very visual people, and her ideas will spark images in my own mind, and vice versa,” said Ristaino.

Esposito was the producer, writer, and director of the film, and therefore greatly responsible for its success. She wanted to make the perfect film, and thought of every last detail. Half of the post-production took place in Italy, and the other half in California. Normally, coordinating this would be immensely difficult, but Esposito’s management capabilities are exceptional.

Location scouting was also vital for the production, and this turned out to be one of Esposito’s favorite parts of filming. She was able to discover different parts of Los Angeles, like Eagle Rock and Griffith Park, Malibu, and Echo Park. Her love for the setting overcame any challenges that come from working outside, like wind and natural light. In order to film like this, a filmmaker must be fast and precise, characteristics that Esposito embodies.

She also wanted to find the perfect team to take charge. She knew how important the music would be in a silent film, and therefore found not just composer, but two, Simone Anichini and Davide Alberto Centolani.

“A big part of making this movie this successful I think was to have the right people around me. It all always comes down to the talents you work with. I learned a lot about delegating and asking for want I needed. I was able to put all the pieces of production together and have exactly what I wanted. Many of the things were planned ahead, but you need to be ready for something not working out and be able to go around it. The secret is to be always ready to change and compromise but never give up,” she advised.

The last piece of the puzzle for the filmmaker was the title. She wanted something that would encapsulate her film. It was when she remembered that in Italian, a mockingbird is also called “the mime” that she realized she had a title.

“I remember I was in the car with Phil and we started to throw titles around, it was hilarious,” she described. “The mockingbird is known to mimic the songs of other birds and the sounds of insects, and this is how it started to come together. Being in love is like being above every physical experience I know, but at the same time when you heart gets broken the impact to the ground is hard. You could say the title represents this feeling but with a tragic romanticism with a pinch of irony in it. I think we got it right!”

That they did. Keep an eye out for Esposito’s work. With talent like hers, we can expect to keep seeing her name for quite some time.

Watch The Mockingbird that Fell from the Highest Branch here.

Top photo by Unknown

Photographer Jennifer Roberts creates visual masterpieces for ‘The Globe and Mail’

From the time Jennifer Roberts was a child, she was always artistic. Originally from the small town of Port Hope, Ontario, she would travel to Toronto with her parents to visit art galleries and cultural events. Even then, at a young age, she was captivated, and understood the power that it was to create something beautiful. It was only natural for her to want to do the same, and that is when she found her way to photography. Now, she is an internationally celebrated photographer.

Roberts is a renowned editorial photographer who specializes in portraiture and documentary stories, and also does work for commercial clients. Her documentary style works well for newspapers while my more produced portraiture work fits in magazines. She truly loves what she does, and everyone she works with impressed with her talents.

“I’ve commissioned Jennifer on various shoots for Maclean’s magazine over the last two years. She is an outstanding photographer and my go-to for any high-profile portrait or reportage assignments. I fully trust her professionalism and ability to give the magazine what it needs on every shoot we give her,” said Sarah Palmer, Contributing Photo Editor Maclean’s Magazine.

In addition to Maclean’s, Roberts has shown not only Canada, but the world what she is capable of with her work in The Wall Street Journal, as well as Canadian Business, MoneySense Magazine, and Getty, including her work for the 2016 International Film Festival, photographing Oscar-nominated actors. Her success has been outstanding, and she believes her career truly began when she started working for The Globe and Mail back in 2008.

“Working with one of Canada’s largest newspapers is exciting. Some of my favourite Canadian photographers are regular contributors to The Globe so it feels great to be in such fantastic company. The Globe photo editors provide a helpful amount of direction so I know what type of photography they need for their story. However, they also leave lots of room for the photographer to be creative and bring their story telling abilities to the shoots. Shoots for The Globe are often for really interesting national and international stories that I’m very proud to work on,” said Roberts.

Initially, Roberts was hired by The Globe and Mail for a four-month summer contract. Before this, she shot a documentary photo project about refugees in Myanmar living in Thailand, which highly impressed the newspaper, and they wanted her to join their team. She relocated to Vancouver, British Columbia for the job. When she completed my contract, she moved back to Toronto, but the newspaper didn’t want to let her go, and kept her very busy with freelance work. She has been shooting for them ever since.

“I feel lucky that even when my placement was over I was given regular assignments with The Globe. Being a regular contributor is very exciting as it leads to so many diverse projects. The Globe work has allowed me to shoot a variety of celebrities, to shoot major news events, to shoot beautiful interiors, amazing food and restaurants and meet so many different people for portrait shoots. Working as an editorial photographer means every day is different. I feel like I have the best job in the world,” she said. “Working as a freelance photographer for The Globe and Mail is always interesting. I started my career there doing a lot of news stories but I now tend to shoot more food, lifestyle and portrait work. I make decisions about how to frame and light things based on what the story is and conceptually what makes the most sense. It’s important to always be true to the story you’re telling. Sometimes what makes the best picture isn’t the best way of telling the story and telling a true story is always the most important,” she described.

Since that time, Roberts has done a variety or large and important projects for the paper, where her photography was essential to the project. She did a large portrait of “Project of Women” during the March on Washington, in Washington DC. on January 21, 2017, something that she considers the highlight of her career. It started as an Instagram story but because the portraits were so successful they ended up running on A1 (the cover) of the newspaper and as a massive two-page spread in the interior of the paper.

“It was an amazing time to be in Washington and meeting and photographing all the women out demonstrating was so powerful,” said Roberts.

Roberts has done many more projects for the paper. She recently shot celebrities like -Recent Actress Kate Mara, Actor Stephan James, and Novelist Lawrence Hill, known for The Book of Negroes. She regularly shoots many features, including “My Favourite Room” for the Style Section, as well as business portraits, portraits for the news section, and a weekly shoot for restaurant reviews for the Saturday Edition, the largest edition of the paper.

“I enjoy the pace of this work and the process of being able to conceptualize and light the scenes. I like how working with The Globe is always different and always interesting. One day I might be shooting a story for the Style section about a beautiful living room and the next day it might be a CEO in their office. I like how every day and every shoot is a new chance to be creative and think of innovative and true ways to best tell a story,” said Roberts.

Readers of The Globe and Mail can keep an eye out for the visual masterpieces that are Roberts’ photos.

 

Photographer Alejandra Sierra brings artistry to everything she shoots

For as long as Alejandra Sierra can remember, she has always been holding a camera in her hands. There was never a moment of doubt about what she wanted to do with her life; she always knew that photography would make her happy. But what makes her luckier than most is that not only does she love what she does, she is extraordinarily good at it.

While being recognized around the world for her talents as a photographer, Sierra has seen tremendous success. She has over 22 thousand followers on Instagram, and her first individual exhibition, “Metalmorphosis” went on to be featured in the leading contemporary art museum, MURA, in her hometown of Guadalajara, Mexico. Her photographs have been seen by hundreds of thousands of readers of various Mexican magazines, and contributed to making the magazine Cream the success it is today. This trend continues in regards to her work with national companies.

“I love photography and I really enjoy product shots, and shooting for national companies allows me to do both,” said Sierra.

Sierra’s work has helped boost many corporations such as La Tequila, Le Garraf, Marisa Pasteleria, Café Barra Café, California Wings and Beer, Cortez, Gaspar, Osaka, Olio Bistro, La Bocha, Ambiderm, Marianka, and Kuu, to name only a few. She was instrumental in providing them with widespread social media exposure, as well as drawing in a growth in sales.

“It makes me really proud to have such big enterprises to like my work, know about it and want their products shot by me,” she said.

One of her more substantial jobs was for the restaurant De La Rosa, and Sierra helped the company revamp their image with her work. For Sierra, the chance to work with a company that gives so many jobs to the people in her country was invaluable.

“It was a humbling experience to know that I was responsible for the pictures of this iconic brand. I shot products I grew up buying as a kid and then portrayed what they represent through a picture,” said Sierra.

Rocío Gómez Michel, the Marketing Manager for De la Rosa, was extremely impressed with Sierra’s work with her brand. She attributes Sierra’s work to the success of the restaurant’s social media, allowing for consumers to feel closer to the brand they grew up with, and they saw a sizable increase in sales as a direct result from Sierra’s photos.

“Given my history as a brand analyst, I know the importance of a good photographer in campaigning and branding an organization. Alejandra’s experience as a photographer, as well as her achievements through her career made her a clear choice to help in the continued success of De la Rosa. Her expertise is an invaluable asset toward the overall success and growth of any organization she becomes involved with, and I can confirm from personal experience that she is largely responsible for much of the success,” said Michel.

Sierra’s work has impacted not only the sales of companies, but also the awareness of many social cause organizations across Mexico. She uses her art to help improve the lives of others in her native country, something that is not only rewarding, but important.

“Telling a story, bringing a cause to life, being able to make a difference is one of the best feelings in the world,” said Sierra. “It makes me really proud. I feel useful and that I´m making a difference through my passion and career. Being able to help doing what I love the most is amazing.”

Of the various social causes she has helped, what was perhaps the most substantial was Sierra’s work with Mi Gran Esperanza (MGE), a widely renowned association dedicated to the eradication and treatment of cancer. Mi Gran Esperanza is a civil association founded 22 years ago that helps to treat and attempt to cure children with cancer. More than 3,000 children and their families, have been helped by the association, and they are one of the most important associations of our kind in Mexico. Mi Gran Esperanza helps with physical, emotional and spiritual health and recovery of low income patients and their families. Each year, they treat around 400 kids mostly from the western side of our country, helping them to overcome their battles.

“Working with MGE was Bittersweet. It was sad, because you never want kids to get cancer, but being able to know that my work was going to help their lives being a little bit better was great. It was an honor to shoot this brave kids and their families,” said Sierra.

Sierra’s photos were featured in the annual calendar that the organization puts out every year to fundraise and provide as a thank you for their donors. The calendar showcases the patients, the installations, the families and what they do. Estela de la Alba Rulfo the CEO of Mi Gran Esperanza, says that they chose Sierra for this project based on her previous work and reputation as an outstanding photographer.

“Alejandra’s leading role as the photographer for our calendar was instrumental in raising money for our organization, and that we required a top tier photographer to complete this task. After working with Alejandra, I am confident that we made the right choice. Thanks to Alejandra’s preeminent skills as a leading photographer, as well as her patience and ability to complete shoots timely, the people felt comfortable, happy and familiar in each shoot. The results were amazing pictures and a truly beautiful calendar. The closeness was such that Alejandra even became a sponsor for one of the girls she felt the most connected with. This encapsulated the desired tone of the calendar, and showcased the impact that the donations have on many of our patients and families. I am wholly grateful to have worked alongside her throughout this project,” said Rulfo.

The calendar has unparalleled success, and sold nearly 10,000 copies. Because of such tremendous success, MGE presented Sierra with a recognition as a thank you for all the work done and the positive results.

“It was great being able to help them and put a smile on their faces,” said Sierra.

Sierra chose the uplifting theme of gratitude for her photos, and showcased the reflection of this emotion from the families, whose medical expenses are entirely covered by donations. After choosing the theme, she had to coordinate the photo shoots. This resulted in a month of organizing and shooting, and dividing what our services include, what did we do with the donations and how the families were thankful for them. Sierra shot the patients, their families and the events, and was ultimately responsible for the majority of the calendar.

“This project has been one of my most valuable lessons in life. Seeing the kids so positive, so brave, and so happy was really inspiring,” she concluded.

From Still Shots To Moving Images, Irem Harnak is a Visual Genius

The world is full of people who take pretty pictures, so what is it about the work of certain photographers that sets them apart from the pack? What quality do they contain that others lack? The answer lies is their ability to make the observer feel something, to capture an emotion or a moment in time.

Irem Harnak, a photographer whose name is internationally recognized throughout the world of fashion and commercial photography, is one of those rare visionaries whose portraits flawlessly capture the personality and emotion of her subject in a way that transports viewers and makes them feel as if they know the person in the photograph.

Over the years Harnak has amassed an astonishingly impressive portfolio of work that places her among the upper echelon of today’s photographers. Marie Claire (China) featured her shots of designer Erin Kleinberg, who dresses Golden Globe winner Lena Dunham(“Girls), and her long list of fashion stories and editorials have been featured in other well-known print and online magazines such as The Ones 2 Watch, The Fashionisto, Fantastics, Bon Bon, the Uk’s Kenton, Boys by Girls and Pause, Germany’s Superior Magazine, and more.

Audiences will also recognize Harnak’s work from the plethora of lookbooks and campaigns she’s shot for recognizable fashion brands over the years, such as leading activewear brand Titika, women’s golf apparel company Birdy & Grace, swimwear company Zubaida Zang, top Canadian designer Joeffer Caoc and others.

Harnak was also hired by Baker Vandertuin Inc., an ad agency known for its creation of successful campaigns for major clients such as the Heart & Stroke Foundation, Canadian Touring Car Championship and Durabond Racing, to shoot famous jazz singer June Garber.

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Jazz singer June Garber shot by Irem Harnak

“She is an amazing jazz singer, great performer with so much charisma, elegance and energy. I find it hard to get that kind of energy from the 16 year old models I shoot,” admitted Harnak about shooting Garber.

With such a wide variety of subjects, the through line that connects all of Irem Harnak’s work is the eye-catching creativity she brings to the table and the way she manages to bring out the  unique personality of each of her subjects in every shot.

Although she has spent the last decade in Canada, Harnak was raised in Istanbul, Turkey, a thriving city that she described in an interview with Yes Supply Collective as: a crazy, beautiful city with layers upon layers of civilization and history. It’s a place where everything has a voice, everything talks, day and night. The waves of the sea, the ferries going east and west, the seagulls, the breeze, the cars honking, people rushing from one street to another simultaneously talking to each other, telling each other stories day and night.

Anyone who’s had the chance to check out some of Harnak’s breathtaking and emotive photography will immediately see how her early beginnings in a visual inspiring place such as Istanbul has impacted her work.

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Jenna Earle shot by Irem Harnak for Kenton Magazine

While Harnak’s shots of famous models such as Carly Moore, Jenna Earle, Emma Génier and Robbie Beeser have put her work in the spotlight and made her a sought after fashion photographer, she’s also managed to successfully translate her skills as a photographer into the film world.

Harnak says, “I have always been inspired by cinema, that was one of the things that pushed me to become a photographer. Being a photographer one understands the lighting, the framing, how to execute a visual language in one or more frames. When you are a cinematographer, you need to do everything a photographer is doing to create a unique shot, but bear in mind that whatever you are framing is a continuous action not a moment frozen in time.”

As the cinematographer of the films “Personal Space,” “Living with Strangers” and “I Am You,” Harnak has proven her ability to move from shooting beautiful stills to creating moving imagery that effectively tells a narrative story.

The feature film “Personal Space” follows Sid, played by James McDougall (“The ABCs of Death 2”), a down in the dumps twenty-something guy trying to move past his recent breakup with Karri, played by Amelia Macisaac from the 2015 comedy “The Spirit of 39B.”

A self-proclaimed anti-love story, “Personal Space” is one of the few films out there that truthfully depicts what it’s like when the passion fades from a relationship, the uncomfortable phase that follows when two lovers have no choice other than to separate and the unglamourous depressive period that follows a break up. The way Harnak chose to capture the shots throughout the film create an authentic portrayal of real life, without all of the escapist fairytales that most films rely on.

About shooting “Personal Space,” Harnak explains, “I was working in really tight spaces, I was literally in the actors’ personal spaces, I had to light the space with little lights and rely on bounces, and reflectors. It depicted the feeling of loneliness and being lost that we were trying to get across.”

Just like real life, “Personal Space” is often awkward to watch, for example, the many times Sid tells Karri he wants to talk but has nothing to say. Overall the film gives viewers an accurate slice of live view into a real breakup, and Harnak’s cinematography nails the mark the whole way through.

While Harnak received praise for her cinematic work on “Personal Space” and “Living with Strangers,” her work on “I Am You” is what has really brought her unparalleled talent as a cinematographer into the spotlight.

“I Am You,” which debuted at Toronto’s Kaleidoscope interactive art crawl, is more than a movie, it’s an innovative step in using virtual reality technology to create a film. The film follows a young couple who discover a new VR app, which allows them to swap bodies and experience life as the other; and, as the viewers watch the film from the characters’ perspectives, it’s as if they too have been transported into the film.

About her work on “I Am You,” Harnak explains, “I shot the traditional part of the film. With the framing I set up, I was trying to describe the alienation, disconnectedness the couple was feeling towards each other. I placed the camera at a considerable distance and used a bit of an unconventional frame cropping to make the viewer feel unease.”

Produced by Cinehackers, “I Am You” has garnered an overwhelmingly positive response with Vice writing: Cinehackers had created a way to let virtual reality users feel like they were in a first-person perspective movie, kind of like Being John Malkovich… And Toronto Film Scene writing: ‘I Am You’ is an amazing piece of work in VR filmmaking. An intimacy enveloped me that I had never felt before while watching a film.

Although photographer Irem Harnak has clearly cut out an indelible mark for herself as a fashion photographer, her work as a cinematographer is definitely worth taking note off; and frankly, we can’t wait to see what she comes up with next!