All posts by Scott Prewitt

Editing Genius Rudy Vermorel Engages Millennials with his Work

At the heart of every production, whether it’s an advertisement or an epic drama, is a story with a purpose. The writers, cinematographers and director are all critical to a project’s creation, but it’s at the editor’s desk where it becomes more than just raw footage and words on a script. It’s up to the editor to see the forest through the trees — to know the story that’s being told, and to be able to put the right scenes together in the right places like so many puzzle pieces, to create the final product that movie theater audiences and home viewers will ultimately see.

The job of an editor can be grueling, but for Rudy Vermorel it’s all a labor of love. Painstakingly parsing through hundreds of hours of footage, one second at a time, is just the beginning of Vermorel’s zenlike process. He cuts, splices and rearranges scenes with a methodical efficiency and confidence honed by experience, breathing life into the story with every move.

“Once I have the footage I start to watch it to get an idea of the general tone,” Vermorel said. “If there is music in the background of the video I listen to the song to feel all the emotions and adapt the song to the footage. Then, I start cutting and I create my magic.”

In 2016, Taco Bell hired Vermorel as the lead editor for the company’s web series “Taco Tales,” an innovative marketing campaign geared toward the millennial demographic. In each episode, actors reenact Taco Bell-related stories found online at sites like Facebook and Reddit. Lighthearted and at times zany, editing the web series gave Vermorel the chance to showcase his talent for comedic timing. Moreover, the decision by such a massive company to hire Vermorel for a major social media marketing campaign speaks volumes about his talent.

Vermorel worked hard to earn his reputation as a leading figure in the field, a reputation which in turn earned him the trust of a wide array of high-profile clients internationally. Among countless other productions he’s served as the lead editor on advertisements for Ford, music videos for artists including MTV Video Music Award winner Demi Lovato, and in 2016 he expanded his repertoire with a venture into the rapidly growing market of mobile gaming.

Supercell – the group behind the runaway hit game “Clash of Clans” on iPhone and Android smartphones – has relied heavily on its strategy of widespread marketing to entice players into joining, to great effect. When the company released “Clash Royale” in 2016, it began preparing for a massive advertising blitz and Vermorel was recruited as the campaign’s editor.

“I am not a big game player so… at first I was apprehensive about how to edit it,” he said. “I figured out that the best way to work on it was to start playing the game, and I enjoyed it a lot. After that, I had so many ideas for how to highlight ‘Clash Royale,’ and all the fun, strategy and entertainment that make up the game.”

Initially the campaign was challenging for Vermorel, but he quickly adapted and before long the campaign had produced 20 videos publicizing “Clash Royale.” The videos racked up more than 120 million views, and the game became the top downloaded and highest-earning app on the iOS App Store overnight.

“I was very attached to the characters. I attributed to them a very different style, which allowed me to vary the editing techniques,” he said. “I wanted to showcase the funny side of the characters. For that we worked on their design to make them endearing, then I opted for modern dynamic editing in order to attract the interest of a large audience.”

The campaign was such a wild success that Vermorel was asked to continue editing the game’s ad campaigns for the next three years, the first of which will begin development this year.

Very few people involved in a production can ever be as intimately familiar with the project as the editor. A dedicated editor can spend days or weeks poring through every scene countless times. They can spend years perfecting the ability to bring the narrative together using the timing, cadence, and music of each scene. An editor’s job is to build order from chaos, to understand the director’s vision for a project and to bring that vision to life. A production is only as good as its editor, and Rudy Vermorel is the best there is.

Copenhagen Model and Actor Andreas Holm-Hansen Shines Bright!

Andreas Holm-Hansen shot by Freddy Billqvist
Andreas Holm-Hansen shot by Freddy Billqvist

With the poise of a veteran thespian and an appreciation for the beauty of the human form, Andreas Holm-Hansen is a remarkable figure with talent that shines through in his work as both an actor and model.

In his first big role, Holm-Hansen played ‘Mad’ Mads Steen in the Swedish series “Dreaming in Mono.” The show’s characters were each from a different Scandinavian country, with ‘Mad’ Mads Steen hailing from Holm-Hansen’s native Denmark.

“This was the first time I was given a full script, and I had a lot to learn and memorize,” he said, recounting the initial shock of jumping into such an extensive role so early in his career. “My character goes through a big transformation, and trying to play this was an eye-opening experience for me.”

When Holm-Hansen began acting in Los Angeles shortly after, opportunity found him almost overnight when he was cast in a lead role in the music video for “Blow Me (One Last Kiss),” the latest hit single at the time by three-time Grammy Award-winning musician P!NK.

For Holm-Hansen, there is far more to “being in front of the camera” than simply “being” there. To him, every time he steps into the frame is a chance to step into someone else’s mind.

“I love that your body is your main tool, that you need to learn new things for every role you play,” he said. “With acting no two days are alike — new people, new locations and constantly new impressions and experiences.”

Holm-Hansen has talent in spades, but he also has the added advantage of looking every bit the part of the handsome Hollywood leading man. He is quite literally the picturesque embodiment of a cover model. With his toned physique, air of confidence and striking red hair, it’s no surprise he’s caught the attention of some of the most influential figures in the field today — including famed fine art photographer Thomas Knights. When Knights set out to make a book featuring the 100 hottest redheaded men in the world, he approached Holm-Hansen to be one of the “Red Hot 100.”

“In ‘Red Hot 100,’ I was featured along with 99 other redheaded guys, and we were branded the ‘unofficial 100 hottest redheads in the world,’” Holm-Hansen said.

The photos, which celebrated “ginger” men’s sexuality, were used in Knights’ high-end coffee table read “Red Hot 100.” Holm-Hansen described it as an amazing experience, but there was no way he could have known how immense an impact the shoot would have on his career.

The first book had featured 100 models. But in 2016, Knights began a follow-up, “Red Hot II” with creative director Elliott James Frieze, and chose Holm-Hansen to be one of just a handful models. The book once again focused on redheaded men, but this time it was a more intimate approach. With fewer models, the new series of photos of Holm-Hansen received a much greater focus.

Andreas Holm-Hansen on the cover of Thomas Knights' "Red Hot II"
Andreas Holm-Hansen on the cover of Thomas Knights’ “Red Hot II”

“The book is built around stories of many redheads, who are known for being bullied and for often having a rough time with name calling and teasing,” Holm-Hansen said. “Thomas Knights gathered many of us together and allowed us to share our stories and show that even though we had it tough, we fought through it and became the strong individuals we are today.”

Being featured in “Red Hot II” was an honor in itself, but when Knights was finalizing the book for print Holm-Hansen was in for a big surprise — he was chosen to be the cover model, the very first thing people would see when they picked up the book.

“I had worked really hard to be in great shape for the shoot, and then I was told after the project…  that I would be getting the cover,” he said proudly. “It feels amazing.”

Both books are available now, and with Holm-Hansen appearing prominently on the cover, “Red Hot II” is impossible to miss — or resist.

Andreas Holm-Hansen is a shining star, a fact which continues to capture the attention of those in Hollywood and beyond. With talent, charm and good-looks that could heat a cold-room, he is truly unparalleled by any other figure in the industry today.

From Acting to Covering the Red Carpet, Shanika Ocean has Our Attention

Shanika Ocean
Shanika Ocean at the Vin & Omi show, Congress Hall, London, 2016

 

After years of hard work and dedication, London-native Shanika Ocean has truly done it all — from her innumerable roles in film and television, to hosting television shows live from the red carpet, to a number of widely acclaimed performances as a singer in internationally broadcast competitions. A naturally gifted thespian, she’s a master of adapting to any and every role that comes her way. That talent has proven invaluable in an industry where many actors are often limited in the scope and range of their performing.

Ocean got her first taste of the spotlight as a child modelling and appearing on several children’s BBC shows. She then went on to take part in the British vocal competition series “The Choir.” The show saw her travel to China, where she performed for audiences watching around the world on international television. It gave her a chance to show off her vocal chops, but moreover it was that experience which set her on the path of a career in front of the camera.

“It was the first series I ever did and it was amazing to audition and then be picked along with 20 other people to be part of the choir,” Ocean recalled. “We flew to China to represent Great Britain in the World Choir Olympics and it was an experience I will never forget.”

In the film “Do Us Part,” Ocean delivers an unsettling performance as the lead character Shea, a woman driven to madness by her boyfriend’s incessant philandering.

“She was sweet and innocent and pretty much the perfect girlfriend,” Ocean said, describing Shea before her boyfriend’s constant cheating sends her past her breaking point. “Then the next minute she gets a gun and shoots her boyfriend. She can’t take it anymore.”

The film effectively makes audiences empathize with both Shea and her boyfriend, seeing each as both the villain and the victim. The morbid tragedy gives viewers a peek into the psyche of the serial cheater and the betrayed girlfriend who kills him.

Not all of Ocean’s roles are as dark as “Do Us Part” however, such as her role on “The T-Boy Show.” The British series stars Tolu Lope as the titular T-Boy, a wealthy Nigerian teen who travels to England to live with his working class aunt and awkward cousin.

“In the episode, T-Boy is upset with Abigail, the girl that he loves. She isn’t interested in him so he decides to go on a date with my character, Ella,” said Ocean. “Ella is not at all who he thought she was, and to make things worse Abigail catches him in the act.”

Ocean’s roles span from the light-hearted to the unhinged, from dramas to comedies to action-packed thrillers, and everything in between. But in addition to all of that, Ocean is perhaps best known for her countless appearances as a host and presenter on an array of series over the years. One such series was the enormously popular “Unplugged” on OH TV, which has given new or unsigned artists and bands the opportunity to become breakout sensations in the music industry. In addition to “Unplugged,” Ocean has hosted a myriad of other programs and events, notably the 2012 MOBO Awards, Capital Xtra Radio, and has covered London Fashion Week since 2015 as well as L.A. Fashion Week in 2016 for Fashion Thirst UK, which provides viewers with all the latest news and trends in the world of high fashion.

“When I did the red carpet at the MOBO Awards, that was a big moment for me,” she said. “I had always watched the MOBOs since I was a child and I had always wanted to go. And now here I was, interviewing celebrities from the likes of Rita Ora, Dionne Warwick, TLC and Emeli Sande.”

Ocean just finished shooting her latest project, the first episode of the upcoming series “Pursuit,” in which she gets to show off her skills as an action-star in the role of Officer Torres.

“I was running around with a gun, which I had never done before. I didn’t even know how to hold a gun properly when I started,” she said with a laugh. “But it was super fun and took me out of my comfort zone, and has made me really want to focus on doing action projects. I literally felt like I was in CSI.”

For someone whose skillset is as diverse as Ocean’s, it can often be more difficult to choose roles than to find them. After her roles in film, television, theater and her dozens of hosting and presenting credits, Ocean has developed a simple method of choosing her projects.

“Sometimes when I am given a script to read, I can feel the character and visualize myself playing them instantly,” Ocean said. “If I have that feeling, I know the role is for me.”

Pushing His Craft to the Limit, Actor Leandro Simozza Shines in Drama

Leandro Simozza
Actor Leandro Simozza shot by Lishabai Yi

For some, the drive for creative expression is instinctive. Just as a person may inherit their father’s eyes or their grandmother’s nose, so too can they inherit a passion for the arts. That couldn’t be more true than it is for Venezuelan-American Leandro Simozza, who comes from a family rich with creative talent. His incredible skill as an actor is due in no small part to the inspiration and encouragement he’s received from his mother, an accomplished painter, and his uncle, a virtuosic musician.

Simozza has been acting on screen and stage his entire life, and the combination of that experience and his innate gift for performance shines in every one of his roles. Moreover, the impact of his work is made all the more powerful by his penchant for frequently addressing social issues in his projects.

“I like to make something that has a strong message to society and the world,” Simozza says of his wide range of roles. “It is so important to do something one feels passionate about and I am grateful to have been able to portray many different kinds of roles.”

To call Simozza’s list of credits diverse isn’t an exaggeration, but an understatement. The Venezuelan tour de force has embodied everything from a family man struggling with alcoholism in “Regrets” and an American crack fighter pilot in “The Second Coming of Christ” to a modern day cartel mobster in “The Head of The Mouse.”

In addition to being the writer and editor of the film “Regrets,” Simozza also starred in the tragic drama as Emiliano, a father determined to drink himself to death after the loss of his daughter.

“He tries to destroy his life, but thanks to his nurse and professional help he realizes all the damage he’s caused and tries to overcome the situation,” Simozza said. “He wants his daughter to be able to look down on him and be happy about the fact that he’s changed his life and quit drinking.”

Because he was so thoroughly involved in every part of the production, Simozza went to great lengths studying and researching both the subject matter and the script. That research even included attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings and hearing the true stories of real people who have lived the similar substance abuse nightmares as his character Emiliano in the film.

When he wrote the script for “Regrets,” Simozza was determined to shine a light on the iron grip of alcoholism and on the life-shattering toll this insidious disease can take on not only the afflicted, but on their families and loved ones.

 

Leandro Simozza
Leandro Simozza (left) & Christos Tsiloglanidis (right) in “Beaten” shot by Domingo Santay

 

That drive to tell compelling stories with powerful messages is what led Simozza to play the racist antagonist in the film “The Murder of Tasneem Ali.” The film follows the titular character Tasneem, a young Muslim girl, as she is relentlessly harassed and derided by Simozza’s character. Filmed in black and white, “The Murder of Tasneem Ali” is a gripping examination of Islamophobic abusers and their victims.

Simozza once again portrayed an addict in “Escaping the Gang Life.” His character, Luke, is a criminal hardened by years of drug abuse. Audiences soon see that beneath the surface of his sordid lifestyle lies a good, albeit flawed man. Luke’s friend and fellow gang member Luan, played by Klement Tinaj (“Furious 7”), struggles to leave the gang alive.

“His exit is violent, and the surviving gang members will not allow Luan to get away without a massive blood bath,” Simozza said. “My character is one of the members of the PMW Gang and he helps Luan find out who killed Luan’s sister, Angela, and get revenge for their loss.”

Whether explosive and action-packed or heartfelt and dramatic, Leandro Simozza’s works are almost always centered around issues of social strife. Like his mother and uncle, he recognizes the uniquely powerful role of the arts as a mirror for humanity. Addiction, prejudice and violence are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of the scope of subjects examined in Simozza’s work. Brilliant and unrivaled not just as an actor but as a writer, editor and producer, Simozza’s long and ever-growing list of credits continues to amaze critics and audiences alike.

 

 

Multicultural Roots Help Actor Ashley Tabatabai Take on Diverse Characters on Screen

Ashley Tabatabai
Ashley Tabatabai shot by Adam Lyons

 

International actor Ashley Tabatabai has benefitted immensely from his worldly background and time spent in an array of countries, surrounded by exotic and varied cultures, languages and people. Born in the UK to parents of English, German and Iranian descent, he was raised in Spain, and picked up an American accent during his years in International school. All of this lends to Tabatabai’s mysterious aura   enhanced by a grasp of dialects which make him an invaluable asset for casting directors. But it’s his raw talent as a performer that forms the keystone in the illustrious career he’s built for himself.

Tabatabai has been extremely active in the industry for years. First and foremost he is an actor, delivering powerful performances in several television series including “Color Me Grey” and “Have I Been Here Before?,” as well as in films such as “Digital You,” “Louis: Lost In Motion,” and the upcoming drama “Falsified.” His love of acting, however, stems from his passion for storytelling. That’s why the extensive list of credits he’s accumulated includes not only his myriad roles as an actor, but also his work as a writer and producer on an array of acclaimed projects.

“I operate on two fronts. One as an actor, auditioning for and booking great roles, and the other as a storyteller and producer who creates his own content. I believe the two to go hand in hand,” Tabatabai said. “I’m a huge advocate of creating original work and telling your own  stories.”

Last year Tabatabai assumed the role of undercover cop Johnny Clemence in the first episode of the upcoming series “Color Me Grey.” Surrounded by mobsters and in too deep to get out, the constant risk that Johnny will be found out grows more and more imminent. As the suspense grows to a crescendo, viewers will find themselves glued to the edge of their seats. Though everyone in this series leads a double life, this is especially true for Johnny.

 

Ashley Tabatabai "Color Me Grey"
Scott Michael Wagstaff (left) & Ashley Tabatabai (right) in “Color Me Grey” shot by Adam Lyons

 

“Johnny is a really enigmatic character, quietly observant and always processing and calculating,” Tabatabai said. “This is a guy who has gone undercover to infiltrate a criminal organization, whose own members lead double lives to help do their underhand business. So in essence Johnny is operating multiple covers at all times.”

Another of Tabatabai’s films, the early 20th century period piece “Louis Lost In Motion,” blew audiences away in 2014 with its imaginative approach to storytelling. Filled with intrigue and mystery, the film focuses on two key figures in early filmmaking — Louis Le Prince and Thomas Edison.

“[This] is a film based on the conspiracy theory around Louis Le Prince, who is famed as the first person to ever record moving images on his single-lens camera. He mysteriously vanished after boarding a train, before ever getting to patent his invention,” Tabatabai said. “To this day, no one knows what happened to him or why.”

Often, it is particularly difficult for actors to play real people, contemporary or historical. When the opportunity to arose for Tabatabai to do so, he jumped at the chance.

“The period costume as well as hair and makeup really helped me to drop into the body of the character. Being immersed in the actual locations where he actually spent time was a great way to picture what his experience might have been like,” he said. “There is always a sense of pressure involved when portraying a real person, especially someone as iconic as this.”

Check out the trailer for “Louis Lost in Motion” below:

Most recently, Tabatabai stars as Javier Baena in “Falsified,” an upcoming film about the reunion between a father and the son who was stolen from him at birth. Tabatabai also wrote and produced the film, which is based on a frighteningly real epidemic of infant thefts that occurred over the course of 50 years.

“It’s very much about the dynamic between a parent and child, and in particular a father and son,” Tabatabai said, describing the stirring drama. “On another level I feel it’s important to raise awareness of the scandal that happened in Spain.”

The vast range of roles he’s portrayed speaks volumes to his talent and reputation as an actor. Eager audiences can catch Ashley Tabatabai in “Falsified” later this year, and in the upcoming film “Digital You,” which is set for release in 2017.

Spotlight on Canadian Actress Cecilia Deacon!

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Canadian actress Cecilia Deacon

 

Often, the pursuit of one’s dreams takes a leap of faith, and this is especially true for prospective actors. To get one’s foot in the door as an actor requires a great degree of luck; to actually walk through the door and find lasting success requires charisma, poise, and most of all, talent. Cecilia Deacon has all of those qualities in spades, and the actor’s long list of diverse credits speak volumes to her enormous dedication.

Her leap of faith began with her journey to New York at 17, to attend the prestigious acting conservatory, the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. As an AADA alum, she is in the company of Hollywood giants Robert Redford, Danny DeVito, and Lauren Bacall, among countless others. Shortly after graduating in 2013, Deacon was featured in the hit comedy “Delivery Man,” starring Chris Pratt (“Parks and Recreation,” “Jurassic World,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”) and Vince Vaughn (“Wedding Crashers,” “The Internship,” “Old School”). The decision to cast Deacon in the star-studded and uproariously hilarious film is a testament to her talent as an actor.

Deacon just finished work on her most recent project, “The Transcendents,” in May. Directed by playwright Derek Ahonen, the film tells the story of a group of people who were once tied together by the music scene, but now find themselves at odds. Faced with a range of obstacles, each must either overcome their personal challenges or be crushed beneath the adversity.

“[The film] is essentially a Rock n’ Roll, PTSD driven, film noir,” Deacon described. “There are so many different elements to it.”

Deacon was cast in the role of Cecilia, the film’s protagonist, whose true love has been long-absent in her life. Tragedy, heartache, and disability have shaped Cecilia’s life; however, despite arguably having the most reason to be upset with her circumstances, she remains a steadfastly optimistic beacon of hope to those around her.

The story, at its core, is essentially about people trying to overcome – to transcend – the painful experiences that have shaped them,” she said.

In addition to her work in film, Deacon has also been featured in a number of television and serial roles. She was cast in the lead role of a particularly chilling episode of the popular Investigation Discovery series “Deadly Sins.” For the young women before her, becoming romantically involved with the episode’s antagonist proved to be a death sentence. Deacon played Stormy, the sole survivor of the homicidal adulterer’s dark machinations.

In the more light-hearted series “Catch-30,” Deacon played the lead role of Sandra, a well-to-do young woman making her own way in the world. Sandra is the core of a tight knit group of twenty-somethings who find their friendships with one another tested by life, love and sex in the adult-world.

“Sandra was the privileged one in her group of friends, all glamour and gold. For all that she For all of her overt confidence, she was intensely vulnerable.” Deacon said. “She hid it behind the mask of what everyone expected her to be. ”

Playing Estelle in No Exit with Christopher Wharton and Regina Blandon; play directed by Derek Ahonen
Cecilia Deacon (L), Christopher Wharton & Regina Blandon (R) in “No Exit”

Her experience acting in film and television is extensive, but Deacon has never strayed far from her roots in theater. Prior to her starring role in “The Transcendents” she had the opportunity to work with the film’s director, playwright Derek Ahonen, in his 2011 play “No Exit.” Deacon played Estelle in the production, which was an existential examination of the limits of human resilience in the face of unimaginable strain.

“It challenged me as an actor in a way no role has since,” recalled Deacon. “It was an exercise in despair; discovering what was each our own personal hell. But the most difficult thing about playing Estelle was not even that we were in hell; it was that the character herself found safety in all the places that I myself do not.”

Whether on stage or in front of the cameras, Deacon has proved herself to be an immensely talented actor whose versatility knows no bounds. With a charisma that most people only dream of, she is a born performer; and her audience eagerly awaits her next move.

Spotlight: Award Winning Cinematographer Martin Kobylarz

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Cinematographer Martin Kobylarz

Cinematography is a delicate balance between the technical and the creative, and Polish director of photography Martin Kobylarz has mastered the art of walking that fine line. Known for his work on both films and commercials, Kobylarz’s projects often raise questions about issues facing society in the past, present and future.

Born in Denmark to Polish parents and educated at the prestigious American Film Institute in Los Angeles, Kobylarz uses his vast and worldly experience to raise the bar for his craft. Recently, he was the cinematographer in charge of the National Autistic Society’s awareness campaign commercial, “Can You Make It To The End?”

“The whole commercial is seen from a first person perspective of a child with autism so it was up to me to find the right gear to give this a realistic feel,” Kobylarz said. “When reading about autism they give very specific definitions as to how they feel and perceive the world when they have sensory overload.”

The public awareness campaign was highly effective, and Kobylarz’s first-person approach played a large part in that success. The commercial’s frenetic and tense style is especially impactful, as if the viewer is experiencing the sensory overload as the child would.

Kobylarz has worked on a wide variety of film productions as well, including the 2012 drama “Wolves From Another Kingdom.” Directed by Christopher Carbone (“Mother Nature’s Son,” “Revivify”), the film centers around a group of children trying to survive after the end of the world. The project holds a rare 9.1 out of 10 rating on IMDb, and brought with it the unique challenge of strictly adhering to the child labor laws governing the cast of “Wolves From Another Kingdom.”

 

“My role included being a key creative figure and maintaining production efficiency, whilst working under strict child labor laws,” Kobylarz said. “My responsibilities also included overseeing and ensuring on-set safety rules and guidelines within my department were upheld.”

With more than 25 actors aged 5 to 17, safety standards were obviously a big consideration on-set. However, it’s a very different story within the ravaged world that audiences see in the film. Tasked with keeping his little brother Daniel safe, Aiden must navigate the ruins of a post-apocalyptic hellscape. When the duo meet a band of children living in the wastes, Aiden must decide whether or not to settle down with the group of dystopian Lost Boys.

“We worked very hard in prep across all departments. Plus I had time to read the script 100 times over and really get into the world of the film, and align myself to the director’s vision. I feel like every shot we made was discussed and thought about in prep,” said Kobylarz, who described the project as his favorite to date. “Of course we were open to spontaneous moments of inspiration when we got to the shooting, but because we were so prepared we knew if it was something that fit the project or not.”

Among Kobylarz’s myriad of other projects are the darkly-romantic drama “Do It Yourself,” as well as the upcoming historical drama “Adrift In Soho,” a period piece about a 1950’s artists’ movement in London to end nuclear proliferation. “Adrift In Soho” is currently in post-production and is scheduled to be released to eager UK audiences this July.

Using Nottingham as a stand-in for London, “Adrift In Soho” tells the story of the activists who pioneered the counter-cultural anti-war movement which evolved into a phenomenon that defined the 1960s Vietnam-era. The exceptional period piece also has the distinction of being the first film to document the origins of a now iconic symbol.

“‘Free-cinema filmmakers’… were documentarians who wanted to film the real people on the streets and everyday life. Coincidentally this was the same time that people started protesting about nuclear bombs and this was when they invented the peace sign that we know today,” Kobylarz recounted. “They used the symbol in their March to Aldermaston, which was a protest march the filmmakers captured. Our film is the first film ever to portray the origins of the peace symbol.”

Because of his unmatched passion for his work, Kobylarz’s projects run the gamut from film to advertising. He learned early in his life that his love for cinematography was a love for all film, and he doesn’t play favorites when it comes to genre or subject. In fact, the productions he’s been a part of are so diverse and his skills so varied that the only thing they all share in common is the exceptional talent and vision of his expertise as director of photography.