Tag Archives: Australian Talent

Australia’s Mark Davis talks passion for acting and starring in ‘I Want You’

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Mark Davis

Despite having other passions, Mark Davis found himself acting from a young age. Growing up in Melbourne, Australia, his father had an old VHS camcorder, and to pass the time, Davis’ brother and his friend used to use the camera, recording small skits. Being the youngest, Davis was always made to be a bad guy who gets beaten up, or he would be dressed up in his mother’s clothes to play a woman. At the time, he was just happy to be spending time with his big brother, but little did he know he would grow to be a celebrated actor.

Throughout his esteemed career, Davis has been a part of several acclaimed projects, from award-winning movies to prolific commercials. He has starred in films like Lucy and Topdecked, which he also wrote, as well as the upcoming period drama Fallen. Australians also know his face from national commercials for Honda, Crownbet, Interflora, and more.

“I knew acting was always something I had a natural affinity for. Instinctually the acting process made sense to me and even though I was quite shy, I felt freedom when taking on a role. I feel like acting is a culmination of many art forms and for me movement and being in touch with something like your emotions and imagination as a profession just made sense. I like taking a walk in other people’s shoes and to get paid to swear, cry, fall in love and throw chairs is a privilege,” said Davis.

One of Davis’ first tastes of international success came with the 2013 romantic drama I Want You. The story follows Maya, who is deeply in love with a boy who lives in Israel. Maya struggles to maintain her faith in a relationship that unfolds largely on a computer screen after she meets another man who can provide the tangible aspects missing from her relationship. Although tempted, Maya has to ask herself, will this new relationship give her what she truly wants?

“The story really demonstrates that good people can be tempted to do things that are against their morals and who they are. In the end, however, the film is about forgiveness and that message is very strong,” said Davis.

In the film, Davis plays Ethan, a character who was very much the other man in a love story. Ethan had to seduce Maya, who was in a very healthy relationship. He was the protagonist in the film. He came into a healthy environment and had to be the perfect blend of nice and endearing whilst also being the bad guy who is going to ruin a relationship purely for his own sexual gratification. Therefore, Davis had to be extremely charming, and managed to do so in tough shooting conditions. It was extremely hot on set, as they were filming in many different locations during the Australian summer.

“I liked being cheeky and being a person with low morals dressed as a nice guy. I’m more self-deprecating and awkward in real life so I had to channel my inner Brando to pull it off. That’s the joy in acting and I definitely had fun on this film. I’ve always said that no one cares about your enlightenment, the audience will watch because they want to see your darkness. It’s more relatable,” said Davis.

MV5BMjJmNmEyZjItMGIyNS00ZjVjLThiZDctNmViYmU1YWZmOTVjXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMzgwNjU4NzE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,707,1000_AL_I Want You also stars Australian superstar Viva Blanca, best known for her role on the television series Spartacus. The film marked the actress’ directorial debut, and she felt the pressure. Knowing she had to have the perfect casting to make her film a success, she gave Davis the role of Ethan.

With the help of Davis, the film went on to be screened at the Palm Springs International Film Festival, the Newport Beach film festival and the St Kilda Film Festival, seeing great success around the globe.

“It was one of the first films I was involved with and I’m glad it was so highly regarded. Viva is a great creative mind and an amazing talent,” he concluded.

 

Written by Annabelle Lee

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Australia’s Stephanie Evison Williams talks ‘Lazy Boy’ and truthful acting

Stephanie Evison Williams’ day always starts with a coffee. She then will walk her dog and head to a fitness class. She knows how you begin your day as an actress is vital to your success. It is about getting in the right headspace, so when she walks on set she is someone else entirely. She devotes herself completely to those she portrays, even trying to dream about future scenes while embodying her character. That, for Evison Williams, is what being an actress is all about.

From a young age, Evison Williams loved musical theatre, and as an overly creative kid and sometimes, as she describes, a loud child, she found her way into acting. In her high school years, she played Sally Bowles in a small production of Cabaret and that was when she knew. There was nothing else in this world she wanted to pursue, and since that time, she has devoted herself solely to acting, quickly rising and becoming one of Australia’s most sought-after actresses.

“I love the people, like-minded creative people who observe the world slightly differently to most, people who people watch and who go through life with a scalpel trying to understand why people behave like they do. I love the feeling when you are so ‘in’ a moment, it’s the best form of mindfulness or meditation because you are so present, listening and reacting. Creative flow. It’s a drug, acting,” she said.

Known for her work in the Netflix series Rostered On, as well as films such as Playgroundand In the Wake, Evison Williams has had a formidable career, with many highlights decorating her resume. One such project was the award-winning film Lazy Boy, which saw critical acclaim at many prestigious international film festivals, despite being made for the infinitesimal budget of $600 AUD.

Lazy Boy was awarded a 2016 Flickerfest finalist and nominated for the Flickerfest National Tour as well as a SciFi Film festival nomination. It received a Heathcote Film Festival nomination and was an Official Selection and a Top 100 Short Film at the 2016 St Kilda Film Festival. In 2017, it toured theatrically around the United Kingdom with Discover Film.

“It’s fantastic. I am really proud of the film. It’s an amazing story. It’s a great sci-fi-esque, time travel concept with a sinister undertone and a lot of heart,” said Evison Williams.

Lazy Boy tells the story of Ray and when he brings home a new purchase, his pregnant girlfriend is not impressed. Banished to the garage he soon realizes the old La-Z-Boy recliner he bought is in fact a one-minute time machine. Audiences are asked the question: will Ray learn from his mistakes, or is he destined to repeat them forever?

In the film, Evison Williams plays Sarah, Ray’s girlfriend. Although the synopsis may present her as simply hormonal, she is far from it, and she and their unborn baby end up being the catalyst of the story, ultimately affecting Ray’s decision on whether to use the time machine for good. Sarah is trying to hold it all together, and Evison Williams perfectly portrays her struggle. She is pregnant and has a partner who is not rising to the occasion, she hormonal, working and doing all the preparation for the new baby. She is pulled very thin.

To prepare for the role, Evison Williams spent a lot of time working with her scene partner, Steve Carroll, who played Ray. They wanted to ensure they had good chemistry while in front of the camera, as the success of the film hindered on their authentic performance as a couple. For Evison Williams, a large part of her research also went in to studying how a pregnant woman may be feeling when stressed. It would have been easy for her to come off as a “nag” or “buzz kill” and Evison Williams was very conscious of showing her heart and struggle.

“I didn’t want to continue that persistent sexist stereotype. Choices were made to motivate why she is saying and behaving as she is. Not that Dave wrote her like this, but it would have been the easier choice as an actor,” she described.

The Writer and Director of the film, Dave Redman, is a prolific storyteller with a passion for film and television. He has worked in the Australian film and television industry for over 20 years and has established a solid career as a film and television editor, cutting five feature films, 160+ episodes of TV, hundreds of TVCs and more than 45 short films that have played at festivals worldwide. When Evison Williams saw the opportunity to work with him, she was eager to take part. When she read the script, she was hooked.

The story allowed for Evison Williams to dive deep into a character that could have been very two-dimensional if she allowed. In exploring Sarah, her performance was real, and that is what Evison Williams aims for in every performance, a truthful style.

“Even when doing comedy or character I am always aiming for truth. I would prefer watching a scene about ‘what’s for dinner’ more than two people not listening and performing an idea,” she concluded.

 

Written by Sara Fowler

Ben Prendergast creates dystopian world in ‘Post Apocalyptic Man’

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Ben Prendergast

It seems like a long time ago that Ben Prendergast was looking to be a software entrepreneur. The Australian native always had a passion for acting, but the notion of pursuing such a career in Australia is so uncommon, he never felt like it was truly a possibility. Having dreamed of being an actor since he was only a child, it always seemed like just that: a dream. However, when embarking on his technology career, Prendergast decided that he had to pursue his passion, and one day, after landing a role on an NBC television pilot, he decided to turn his dream into a reality. Since that time, he has never looked back, crafting an extraordinary career.

Now, Prendergast is an industry leader in Australia, and seeks to make a difference through his work. With Prendergast as the lead, The Marker aimed to bring awareness to the socio-economic issues in Australia and was funded by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Similarly, his film Punch Drunk shed light on the marginalization of the elderly and mentally unwell. Sometimes, the actor’s love of telling stories is what drives him, which was the case with the feature Predestination. However, no matter what he is working on, his innate talent and dedication to his craft impress audiences, critics, and colleagues alike.

“I’ve worked with Ben on a number of projects. Most recently, we worked on Post Apocalyptic Man. As a writer, usually you’re not working directly with actors, but in the case of this project it became really valuable. Ben’s ability to cold read a scene and bring it to life was a revelation, and something we relied on in the early development right through to final script stage. Ben and I would stay up way too late discussing how we could bring more conflict, more drama, more humanity to this piece and I think it really shows in the final script. But then I was also in the rarified air of watching Ben work on set, and even then, he’s constantly drilling for more in the text, and during shooting I saw him make bolder and more compelling choices. Some of them made it into the final film, some didn’t, but I just remember the feeling on set was electric with every take,” said Daniel Walsh, Screenwriter. “I think Ben just has that thing that you can’t put your finger on. You roll the camera on him and you’re transfixed even before he’s said anything. You think to yourself, “What’s he going to do?” and he always surprises. He’s curious, in a way that most actors are, but he’s curious as the character, which is something else completely. I’m not at all surprised that he’s had the success that he’s had.”

Post Apocalyptic Man tells the story of humanity’s need for survival in a world where they are blind to their own destructive tendencies. The human population is in the grips of decline after genetic modification turns the female population sterile. When it is discovered that a child may carry a gene that is immune to the disease, forces of good and evil converge on a small Australian outback community to find the child and gain control over humanity. Cane Storm, the leader of the evil tyranny, sends his number one henchman Baker, played by Prendergast, to infiltrate the Renegades led by anti-hero Shade. Leathergirl escapes with her brother, who seemingly carries the gene, but is pursued by Baker. Throughout the film, audiences discover that Baker is a genetically engineered mercenary who will show no mercy and is hell bent on finding Shade and the boy who carries the cure.

“This film deals with humanity’s deterioration, something that is on all of our minds, but depicts it with food shortage and the notion of a barren human population. We haven’t been a declining population since World War I, and I think current generations aren’t really aware of that or prepared. This film gave a real sense of a species in decline, and the desperation and hope that springs from that. For me, it’s a fantastic analogy for how we currently look at our food waste, energy production, and government systems,” said Prendergast.

When Walsh and Director Nathan Phillips were looking for a clean-cut super soldier type of actor, they asked Prendergast to audition. Not only was he in incredible shape and fresh off an intensive training program, Prendergast was well-known for his tremendous talent and versatility. After auditioning for the part, he was offered the role immediately.

“From the very beginning it was evident that Ben was a thoughtful and dedicated artist, and he had key elements of his character down at a very early stage. He goes deep within his characters, finding the most truthful elements, but also playing with the duality that most interesting characters possess. We had an absolute blast on and off camera and I now consider him a really close friend. Ben gives over to the madness of filmmaking. He wants to find the gait, the voice, the truth of the human condition as it pertains to his character, but then he goes further than that and wants every other department to function too. He looks after camera department, makeup, wardrobe, etc. As a director, I never have to worry that we’re not going to get the shot,” said Nathan Phillips, Director.

Prendergast was aware, when preparing for the film, that he was not only playing a villain, but also a genetically superior being. Therefore, he wanted to look at the misogynistic and xenophobic nature of historical characters to get into the mindset of Baker. He took particular interest in looking at Nazi-Germany and the horrible beliefs in that time. Physically, he thought he should remain strong, but his vocal quality needed to be gravely and distinctive. Once he had all this figured out, he put on his costume of a trench coat and gloves, and instantly became the character in front of the camera.

“I always believe that even when there are nefarious or even psychopathic characters, they always have righteous reasons for their actions. Baker believes he deserves his place in the future utopia of humanity, and that given his clear genetic advantage he is doing humanity a service by cleansing the world of those beneath him. His narcissism has bred a psychopathic quality, and therefore he can operate in any way that Cane Storm, the leader of empire, needs him to. He’ll take any life and use any means necessary to get what he wants,” said Prendergast. “Strangely, this creates an empathy that an audience can follow, we love our bad guys because they have a mastery over their destiny, they know what they want and how to get it. Don’t we all wish for that?”

Baker was essential to the story of Post Apocalyptic Man, and Prendergast to its success. The film wouldn’t have worked without the conflict that Baker carried. The heroes and antiheroes of the film were struggling for survival in a world without food or the ability to procreate. Baker’s character introduced a final hurdle for the protagonists to take action against the empire, and audiences see that although at first they are terrorized, they eventually find the spark to create the resistance.

“It was such a fulfilling project. We were on a really tight shooting schedule but we made it work, producing something completely unique in the Australian film canon. Now considered a cult film, Post Apocalyptic Man is my favorite punk-film outing ever, and I made a lot of great friends in the process,” said Prendergast.

After premiering at St Kilda Film Festival, Post Apocalyptic Man played at independent theatres in Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. Afterwards, it was distributed digitally and still sees success, eight years after its premiere. If you have the opportunity, be sure to watch the film and see Prendergast terrify and excite audiences.

 

By Sean Desouza

Pauler Lam talks dancing on ‘Steady Mobbin’ and pursuing what makes him happy

It doesn’t feel like that long ago for Pauler Lam that he was working a 9-to-5 in the corporate world. He found that each day sitting behind his desk ate away at his soul. He was working for a pay check, but it wasn’t what made him happy. Then, five years ago, he decided to take his hobby of dancing, which he spent 16 years training for, and transform it into his full-time career. Immediately, he felt a shift in his outlook on life. He was happy, doing what he truly loved. This joy he feels from dancing is contagious, and those who watch him perform, whether live or on television, feel it too.

With an impressive career working on television commercials, Buzzfeed videos, live performances, and various television shows, Lam has become a sought-after Breakdance and Hip-Hop dancer. Originally from Australia, he has taken the American dance industry by storm, and recently was the principle dancer in two national commercial campaigns: one for Hotel Indigo, and the other for American Crew. In both instances, his talents as a dancer and performer are enthralling, grabbing audiences’ attention around the country.

“I am a very driven person who only does what I know will ultimately make me happy and allow me to bring others joy and in turn, give back to the universe. This for me is dance,” said Lam.

One of Lam’s first breakout professional dance roles in the United States was on the television show Steady Mobbin. The series highlights diverse groups of dancers performing various flash mob styles in major cities, empowering the audience to bring out their inner dancer. The surprise element of the flash mob serves as a reminder that art, in this case dance, is all around us in everyday life.

“I loved that the show was about dance. The dancers were the star of the show, not just in the background. The producers understood how important and amazing dancers are and wanted to put us in the spotlight,” said Lam.

The production on the show began in September 2015. In that first season, Lam was featured in episodes 3, 4, 5 and 6. Each episode took a week to film, including rehearsals. Steady Mobbin premiered on The Dance Network both in the United States and worldwide in February of 2016.

As well as being a principle dancer, Lam was also given a feature in an episode where he was interviewed. He was able to explain his background in dance and provide his back story to the viewers. He also had a solo dance moment where he was able to showcase his breakdancing skills.

“It feels amazing to know that people everywhere are able to see me do what I love. It is great exposure for myself as a performer and entertainer in the dance industry. I truly feel blessed to be able to be a professional dancer and the fact that I can do it for a living and put my work out there for the whole world to see is indescribable,” he said.

When Lam first went to audition, he made an error that he now considers to be his saving grace. At the time, he had misread the audition details and went to the venue a day early. No one was there. and it made him very feel very inexperienced as he was new to the industry in those days. However, his mistake actually helped with his nerves, and when he returned the next day all of the initial fear he felt the day before had vanished; he had time to settle down and laugh at himself. When he came back the next day and auditioned, he impressed the Director, Aaron Mostow, as well as the well-known dancer/choreographer Suze Q (known for dancing with the celebrated pop group The Black Eyed Peas) who was running the auditions. While performing, Lam displayed his vast skill and versatility. It was only a week later when he was booked for lead role in the show.

Quickly noticed during the audition process for his unique ability to perform hip-hop choreography as well as bust out exceptional breakdance moves, Lam was essential in the creation process of each episode. In order for the choreography pieces to have a dynamic and recognizable moment, he was frequently featured doing a flip or a trick for the episode’s “wow moment”, keeping the audience captivated. Usually a Bboy would not do the choreography and stick simply to breakdancing, but Lam was able to do it all and help create flawless pieces and smooth transitions for the choreography, and ultimately, the show’s success.

“Pauler is one of the most skilled and versatile dancers I’ve ever come across. He can do Hip Hop choreography and breakdance. That’s a very rare thing for a Bboy to be able to do choreography too. So, I knew right away after seeing him at the audition that he would be perfect for my show. We featured him on an episode and he absolutely killed it in his solo with his crazy tricks and flips. He was so easy and fun to work with and I would love to work with him again,” said Director Aaron Mostow.

Because the show focused on dance, and everyone involved had dance experience, Lam was eager to be part of this experience as one of the first major projects of his career. While on set, he made sure to stay focused, adapt easily, and be professional. Despite the challenge of having to learn many pieces of choreography in a short time frame, with cameras pointed at him and producers watching, Lam shone in each number. Working on the show truly exposed him to working under pressure, something that is common in the industry, and he quickly learned how to excel under such conditions.

“I am, and will always be, very grateful for this opportunity. The other dancers on the show were really fun to work with. Everyone was happy to be in rehearsal and on shoot days. I made some of my first proper LA friends from this show and am proud to still be good friends with them today. I was able to showcase my skills and versatility as a dancer for the first time in the Los Angeles dance industry. I’ve come a long way since then and will continue to push and grow further as a performer. And a special shout-out to Suze Q, Aaron Mostow and all the other dancers from Steady Mobbin,” said Lam.

Being able to showcase his skill on television earlier on in his career opened many doors for Lam, and he is extremely humbled by the experience. Since being on the show, he has become an in-demand dancer in America, with no plans on slowing down. His journey reaffirms that pursuing his dreams full-time was the right choice, and he has never looked back.

I know that this is what I am meant to be doing and truly believe that I am in the right place. I will continue to push myself in this industry to achieve all of my dreams and be the best and happiest version of myself that I can be,” he concluded.

Australian actress Natasha St. Clair-Johnson stars in new film ‘Incall’

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Natasha St. Clair-Johnson, photo by KAT TUOHY PHOTOGRAPHY

“Acting is the one way that I feel free to be myself,” said Natasha St. Clair Johnson. The Australian native has an innate talent, and has loved performing for almost her entire life. As a child, she wanted to be like the people she saw on-screen, but as she grew, this desire became much fiercer. She wanted to tell stories; she wanted to show the wonderful and painful aspects of what it means to be human; she wanted to make a difference with the best way she knew how. Acting became her focus, and performing her way of life. Now, she is one of Australia’s leading actresses, and the passion she feels for what she does is the same as it was when she began her career.

While working her way to the top, St. Clair-Johnson worked on several extremely successful projects, showing her home country and the world why she is so formidable. In the feature film Birthday, the actress has the critical role of a social-worker. Her work led the film to be selected for the highly-prestigious Cannes Film Festival, where it took home the top award for Best Actress in a Foreign Film. Similar success followed with her film Prized, where she co-stars with ‘Twitch’ aka Stephan Boss from So You Think You Can Dance and currently the popular DJ on The Ellen Degeneres Show, as well as the movie Shang, playing a seductive vampire and showing audiences how versatile of an actress she truly is.

“The thrill of performing is like nothing else for me. With film and theatre being such different mediums, they both still give me joy. Being on set has an intimacy, a rawness, and a realism to it,” said St. Clair-Johnson.

Audiences can also look forward to St. Clair-Johnson’s performance in the highly-anticipated film Incall. The film tells the story of a wealthy house wife who gets more than she bargained for when a call girl changes the course of her day into something completely unexpected. It explores ideas of sexuality, power, feminism, and manipulation, with three women all appearing as different facets of what is it to be the modern woman.

“Not many films like to show women that are sexual and strong. It’s considered taboo, and commonly mistaken to be either an excuse for woman to behave in an explicit nature or to get attention. Our film is more about the mind games between people. It’s not about seeing anything happen but the suggestion,” St. Clair-Johnson described.

The film is centered around St. Clair-Johnson’s character and what happens to her over the course of one day. It is a window into the perverse intimacy she enjoys. She is an elegant, well-dressed, poised woman with a dark side. Although she appears to be one way to others, her inner desires are quite different from the persona she displays. She has a certain way about her that can be disarming, which is what the directors were looking for in St. Clair-Johnson’s performance. She perfectly personifies the complicated character, with a hint of possible danger, as you can’t always be sure where the character might take the conversation or situation she is in.

While many films explore a male and female dynamic, Incall involves two strong female characters. These characters are not necessarily attracted to each other, but rather show how they manipulate, judge, and control each other. It is about ego and power. St. Clair-Johnson’s character is the instigator of the events. Therefore, when the director was looking for someone for such an important and complicated role, she knew she had to find someone with immense talent.

“Natasha is gifted and hard working. She always gives 100 per cent to every take and patience beyond what would be required of her. It is a pleasure working with her on and off set. She is very personable. Her unique choices make her an outstanding actress. She has a subtle but compelling ability to seek the nuances in her characters’ behavior, with an unlimited range and keen understanding of the complexities of the characters’ relationships,” said Rachael Murphy, Writer and Director of Incall.

Murphy approached St. Clair-Johnson when she began casting. She knew that she wanted the actress as her leading character to make her film a success. St. Clair-Johnson was happy to take on a role in an all-female film. During the shoot, she found herself being taken away with what was happening. She knew exactly where to go with her character, completely embodying her. She would utilize subtle and exciting exchanges between her co-star and herself, opening up her creative juices. With every script she works on, the actress takes the time to analyze it. She figures out the exact motives behind each of her characters’ choices. For Incall, she worked those choices into her performance flawlessly, displaying intimacy, and passive-aggressive behavior simultaneously.

In addition to acting, St. Clair-Johnson also took on an executive producer role for the film. Although she had never done this before, she was excited to learn about the job, knowing the experience behind-the-scenes would help make her an even better actress. She was able to find the perfect balance between her role as an actress and her executive producing responsibilities, and found herself watching every take and staying engaged in all areas of the film production.

“This project gave me artistic freedom to play with whatever choices I wanted. I was to carry the film and I loved the responsibility of that. Especially showcasing myself in a film that is strongly focused on women. My team and I knew that it would be topical and the LGBT community would also be interested. We were recently approached by a film festival exclusively showcasing films produced and starring woman. It’s an honor,” said St. Clair-Johnson.

Incall is currently in post-production with a release date set for 2018 into the film festival circuit, and then onwards to national release in the United States and Australia. It is also expected to make its way to several Australian television networks, and streaming services such as Amazon Prime, Netflix, YouTube, and Hulu in the short film category. If you get a chance, make sure to check out St. Clair-Johnson’s stellar performance.

Television Host Dan Babic strives to be in the one percent

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Dan Babic on set

Working in a field as gruelling as the entertainment industry is no small feat. Where most individuals see a daunting career path, plagued by unstable income and fierce competition, Australian entertainer Dan Babic has only ever seen a breadth of opportunity. It has never been about a steady pay check, or a permanent “nine to five,” but rather about embracing the unknown and the diversity of challenges that entertaining unveils. When most parents ask their child about what they’d like to be when they grow up, they often expect to hear answers like “famous entertainer” and simply hope that the novelty will wear off with age. This, however, was not the case for Babic’s mother and father, as his unwavering desire to entertain has only grown stronger over the years.

 

“Less than one per cent of the world’s entire population are at the top of the entertainment industry. So, if you want to be part of the one per cent, you have to be prepared to do what only one per cent of people can do,” notes Babic. Unsurprisingly, he is prepared to do just that and more. His relentless desire to share his talents with the world push him to test his own limits and to bring the unique elements of his personality to the industry in ways that other television personalities haven’t before. The result is a seemingly effortless combination of humour and realism that flavour his work in a unique way that one can only truly understand by witnessing him in action. The success that this up-and-coming entertainer has achieved so early on in his career is a result of his natural affinity for entertainment and his drive to showcase himself as an authentic television personality.

In 2016, when Babic was approached to host Fashion One’s Design Genius, Babic couldn’t resist accepting. The series centres around a “fashion-packed” competition that challenges fashion designers to create original and inventive clothing and accessories. A show of this nature requires an effective host. A host who isn’t afraid to challenge its competitors, but who also has the capacity to empathize with the designers and capitalize on the genuine moments that a testing competition orchestrates.

“I wanted to work on Design Genius, as the success the show relied entirely on the host’s ability to captivate, engage and connect a culturally diverse audience of over 400 million people from 173 countries. I wanted to showcase my ability of to unifying individuals of all different backgrounds. The show sought a distinctive, unique personality to host and I knew this is something I have to offer. I knew that I would be an asset to the project. It required a host with the rare skill set needed to take the audience on a journey from beginning, through the middle, to the end in an improvisational, yet precise fashion. This isn’t something that every television personality is able to do, but it is the exact hosting style that I thrive in and so I knew from the start that I was the only person for the job. What’s more, is that I had always dreamed of working with the show’s producer, Tone Innset,” tells Babic.

Fortunately, the reputation that Babic has established for himself presents him as a top tier television host and personality. When producers or directors are searching for a host, his name comes to mind almost instantaneously. Innset’s knowledge of Babic’s talents made her eager to work with the entertainer and Design Genuis’ viewers reaped the benefits.

“Mr. Babic performed the leading role of host for the series Design Genius, where he garnered a substantial amount of praise for himself and the series. In his leading role, his responsibilities required him to complete a number of tasks, including introducing the series, the contestants, and their projects for each and every episode. His larger than life personality allowed him to attract audiences to the show simply by listening to him or watching him, as his exciting interactions with his co-hosts and contestants were often unconventional in the approach, confronting aggressive contestants, or heartily joking and laughing with his fellow hosts and judges. It is imperative for a host to have such a personality, and to utilize their skillsets as a performer to convey this to the audience. In addition to the typical duties of a host, he was also responsible for leading the show as a judge, and he decided which contestants advanced to the subsequent rounds, which contestants were eliminated, and which contestants broke the rules and must be disqualified. Dan has a unique ability to command attention from his audience and the other contestants, as well as his other judges, highlighting his domineering on screen personality, which translates into increased viewership for the series as a whole,” says Innset.

The show’s wide reach is a testament to Babic’s mastery of television hosting and flawless ability to captivate his audience. What’s most impressive, however, is Babic’s ability to remain humble in his rise of fame. In the wake of praise, Babic remains true to himself. “What I like most about being an on-camera personality is that it feels like home. It completely lights me up in every way possible. When I’m hosting a television show, I feel an overwhelming sense of comfort in knowing that I am doing exactly what I am meant to do. The pure joy it brings me extends to all aspects of my life and helps me become the best version of myself that I can be. Words cannot describe how much I love and live for what I do and I am beyond grateful that I get to experience that every single day with my work. It is such a rare thing and I never forget that but I know that my success comes from my persistence, my fearlessness, my hard work and by simply trusting my intuition,” Babic states.

Babic’s talents as an entertainer are unparalleled. Television show creators would be hard-pressed to find a host more dynamic and at ease in front of the camera than him. He was born to be on screen and anyone who has seen his work knows that great things are in store for his future audiences.