Category Archives: Brazilian Stars

Ivan Copelli talks winning Rally MTV’s gruelling competition

Ivan Copelli + Motores 3 - photo by PATRICIA CECATTI
Ivan Copelli and Motores

Ever since Ivan Copelli was a young boy, he has been bursting at the seams with creative talent. When his older brother played in his first band, Copelli would tag along for all of the group’s adventures, admiring their sound and the freedom they had to express themselves. It wasn’t until he turned 10 years old, however, when KISS performed in his hometown, that he realized that his life was pushing him to make music. He was consumed by this desire and he was ready to rock. From that night forward, his life changed forever and now, while others are out working to feed their families, Copelli is out working to feed his soul. He has a hunger within him that most aspiring professionals could only dream of having and it is what pushes him to exceed all expectations. He makes his living by simply living.

“As a musician, I get to immerse myself into many different manifestations of art and music. Especially live music. It is so magical. In developing myself as an artist, I get to collaborate with other artists and together, we get to build something really unique. The real gift, however, is getting to see the audience consuming my art. Watching them interact with the atmosphere I create and seeing them jump, scream, dance, vibrate, etc. It’s indescribable. We feed off of each other and it is such an amazing feeling. It makes me love being a musician,” said Copelli.

In 2004, a close friend of Copelli’s recommended that he audition to drum for a band called Motores. Unsure of whether or not the band would be the right fit for him, Copelli attended a few of their shows and found himself instantly drawn to their music. He was addicted to their energy and their authentic sound. Following a flawless audition, the band knew they needed Copelli’s talents to carry them to new heights and they immediately invited him to drum for them.

For the Brazilian drummer, this opportunity presented a new set of challenges. Motores was a punk rock band, and at the time, Copelli was used to playing pop/rock songs. Rather than letting this obstacle set him back, Copelli jumped at the opportunity use this new experience as an artistic challenge and he dove in head first. The benefits were mutual and while the band were able to share their punk rock knowledge with Copelli, he was able to adapt and to strengthen their music with his combination of experience and raw talent. That’s simply part of who he is as an artist. When he is presented with challenges, Copelli rises. He has a keen interest in expanding his musical knowledge wherever possible and does not limit him to specific genres or styles. It is this versatility that draws a vast array of audiences and other artists toward him.

In 2007, Motores was invited by MTV to take part in their hit reality television series, Rally MTV. Rally MTV is an eight-episode documentation of five original Latin American bands competing for international recognition, as well as the chance to film a music video to be aired on MTV networks across Latin America, Brazil and the United States. The competition was fierce and gained a lot of attention from rock music fans. After 21 days of filming in three different countries, Motores swept the competition and won the show, bringing the band a new level of fame and opportunity, a feat they wouldn’t likely have achieved without Copelli’s artistry.

When Brazilian entrepreneur and customer-focused development advocate, Paulo Ramos, worked with Motores, he experienced first-hand how invaluable talent like Copelli’s is for an, at the time, up-and-coming band. It became evident early on in Motores’ partnership with Ramos that the band’s success could be traced back to Copelli’s leading role.

“Motores has a full roster of supremely talented musicians and Ivan’s leading role as the drummer for the band makes him stand out as one of the most accomplished musicians in the Brazilian music industry. The combination of Ivan’s unprecedented skill, as well as his solid and consistent playing style made him a clear choice for the band, as he is able to repeatedly deliver top notch performances, whether it’s for the band’s albums, their live shows, or even their television performances. His pristine style of drumming not only expertly reflects the tone of the band as a whole, but also stamps their albums with his iconic style of drumming, creating a masterful blend of two truly excellent styles of music. It was inevitable that Ivan found his way to the spotlight based on his success with Motores and I am certain that his leading role in the band was influential for him in more ways than one,” told Ramos.

Winning the show meant wider international recognition for Motores and consequently, for Copelli, it opened several new doors for him to grow his presence in the industry. In fact, it was his great success with Motores that drove Kiara Rocks to seek his talents in 2010. With Kiara Rocks, Copelli recorded and released one of the biggest Brazilian rock albums in several years and he put his heart into the album in ways he hadn’t ever before. He was so inspired by this experience and overwhelmed with motivation to continue to bring excellent content to the realm of rock that he started his own band, Burlesca.

Having achieved such great success drumming in Brazil, Copelli is ready to take his talents all over the world. Whilst some drummers may be content with the milestones he has achieved, Copelli is always thirsty for more. It is not uncommon for him to be balancing several projects simultaneously and determining how best he can accommodate requests from other artists to lend his skill set. No matter which band he is playing for or which artists he is collaborating with, he is just fortunate to be able to do what he loves and to do it well. He aims to release as many records and work on as many albums with as many other musicians as he possibly can because for Copelli, music is who he is.

“It’s the only thing that has always stuck with me since I was a kid. It is the real me. It’s the magic that makes me feel complete every day,” concluded Copelli.

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Writer Guilherme Ribeiro has always aimed to make a difference in society

Guilherme Ribeiro has been writing since he was just a child. Growing up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, his marks in school were always best in the subjects of Portuguese, History and Geography, all writing based, constantly impressing his teachers with his compositions and use of words. It was always easier for him to write about something or draw a cartoon character rather than trying things in math or the sciences. Even at a young age, writing was his passion, and after getting his first computer at the age of eight, he started developing both his writing and online savvy. It was therefore a natural progression for him to eventually become an online content writer, and now he is one of Brazil’s best.

Ribeiro has impressed many with his writing in many mediums and genres. He has written news articles, travel blogs, and television documentaries. He has helped build up websites and has impressive social media knowledge. His work on the new music project Welocalize, as well as Mastercard Priceless Rio, Toxic Rio, and Globo TV network, just a few of the highlights of his esteemed career.

“I can see myself now in a highlight moment of my career. I found my way on writing about entertainment, music and content for e-commerce and I really believe that’s the way conventional writers will renew themselves and find another alternative to make money and get in touch with readers. I’m working for important clients, sometimes signing my name on articles, others just working with content editing, and creative input for online stores and apps,” said Ribeiro.

Before getting to this point, however, Ribeiro worked to earn the reputation he now has. Part of this involved his work with TV PUC and his award-winning show. The TV show Paternidade Ausente, Histórias Incompletas revealed an important issue for the Brazilian society and could open a discussion about paternity.

“Guilherme had good writing skills that could improve his journalistic knowledge during his time at TV PUC. He participated as a reporter in the most awarded TV show in TV PUC, so was an overall good and enriching experience,” said Carmen Petit, Ribeiro’s coordinator during his time at TV PUC.

According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Estatistic (IBGE), about 9 per cent of children born in 2008 were not registered. The following year, the Brazilian government undertook to zero the number of sub-registrations. They occur when a child is born and does not have the birth certificate made in the same year or within three months of the following year. The distance between the registries and the houses, a common problem in regions of North-Northeastern Brazil, helps to explain the occurrence of sub-registries. Another reason is the lack of knowledge of the free document. In addition, many children are late registered by the mother’s shame in assuming the father’s omission. Of every four birth certificates registered in the country, one does not have the father’s name. The percentage was estimated by the University of Brasilia (UnB), which crossed data of one hundred and eighty-three thousand certificates of notaries in the city and compared them with IBGE figures on children outside the marriage. Paternidade Ausente, Histórias Incompletas speaks about paternal recognition, paternity investigation, and the relationship between parents and children.

“This is such an important subject almost not explored by Brazilian media. When it was released, I was selected by my boss to be the reporter.  I was one of the producers and reporters, and we made the show from scratch, which was a huge thing for me at the time,” said Ribeiro. “We got so many good results. This TV show was the most awarded show in the history of TV PUC and I could believe I had future as a writer at this time. I learned a lot from my bosses and I wanted to use my skills and desire to make a difference and to create a good content for our society.”

As the reporter and producer of the TV show, Ribeiro was responsible for finding characters, collecting data from institutes, universities, doing the research, and helping to find the best lead for this compelling story. He wrote the script along with another reporter while being supervised by an editor chief. Content was aired by TV PUC in Pay TV, for educational and social communication purposes. The show is still available online, on the TV PUC website.

“When the show started winning awards, I felt I would have a promising future as a writer. We currently have four awards, two of them from a respectful academy for feature films in Brazil, Gramado Film Festival. It was such a pleasure to travel to this small town in the South part of the country to receive two awards, the Best Report of Brazilian University Television and the Best Video of the whole category of Brazilian University Television, both in the 18th edition of Gramado Cine Vídeo Festival in 2010,” Ribeiro described.

Now, almost eight years later with many successful projects on his resume, that initial success from his time at TV PUC was the beginning of Ribeiro’s outstanding career. He has always shown not only a dedication, but a passion for what he does, making him the extraordinary writer he is today.

Photo: Márcia Antabi (left), Guilherme Ribeiro (center), and Mariana Moreno (right) working with TV PUC

Cinematographer Ernesto Pletsch travels to home country of Brazil for new show “Desterro”

DESTERRO, 2016. Dhruv Lapsia (1stAC) and me
Dhruv Lapsia and Ernesto Pletsch on the set of Desterro

Ernesto Pletsch is one of the lucky few. Not only does he get to do what he loves every day, he is exceptionally good at it, and isn’t that the dream?

Originally from Porto Alegre, Brazil, Pletsch has seen success both domestically and abroad. Just last year, he worked on the pilot for the television series Desterro, a show in Florianópolis, Brazil. The series follows the investigations of two detectives in a witchery island located in southern Brazil.

Desterro is a thriller and crime story. My favorite genre to watch. I was very excited about the whole project and the ambition of it,” said Pletsch. “Looking back, I think that was my best experience as a cinematographer. I had a great team, working with people I already trust and felt confident with. In Brazil, I ended up meeting more awesome and talented people that were essential for this to work. Every day was a different challenge and learning to me, making Desterro a very special experience.”

Desterro was inspired in folkloric tales of the island Florianópolis. These folkloric tales were written, drawn and sculpted by a famous artist called Franklin Cascaes. A blend of witchery, mystery and gothic, creating great inspiration for Pletsch and the rest of the team.

“I loved shooting Desterro because everyone was putting their souls into the project. Everyone was doing their best. We had our moments of tension, but we also had those moments of euphoria, and when we called it a wrap and you could just see smiling faces around,” he said.

The pilot was shot during a five day time period in Santa Catarina. The people in the area had not had the opportunity to see a film production before, as the island is somewhat secluded. Pletsch and his team were viewed as true Hollywood guests, and the best treatment was offered.

DESTERRO, 2016. Mayanna Neiva (lead actress, star), Chico Caprario (actor), Dhruv Lapsia (1stAC) and me
Mayanna Neiva, Chico Caprario, Dhruv Lapsia, and Ernesto Pletsch on the set of Desterro

“Shooting in Brazil, as expected, had completely different rules, as in no rules,” Pletsch joked. “We had the freedom to do whatever we wanted to, shoot anywhere at any time. This was very exciting.”

While shooting, Pletsch was presented with the challenge of overcoming an obstacle he had no control over: the weather. Certain scenes would be completely prepared, and when it came time to shoot, it would become windy and rainy. Low tides made it difficult to carry boats to desired locations. Equipment would have to be moved and plans would have to change, but for Pletsch, a seasoned cinematographer, he says that is all part of the experience.

“It will always feel frustrating and disappointing at the time because you have a certain idea in mind, but it happens. You move on, and sometimes it comes out better than you originally thought,” he said.

According to Pletsch, shooting Desterro was different than a usual television show, saying it was shot like a movie. They had four days for twenty pages of script, which gave them a reasonable time for each scene. They took our time and made it day by day.

“Usually television shows would require more efficiency from the crew. On a film, we record five to seven pages of the script a day. For a television episode, it tends to go over ten pages. This can get pretty hectic, and sometimes you prioritize delivery over creativity. That’s how usually goes. In any production, you have to pick at least two sides of the triangle: price, quality and time. If they want something delivered fast, they better have money to accelerate the process. If you don’t have money, you may take time to do something good. But if you don’t have either money or time, you’ll probably end up with something of poorer quality,” he advised.

Despite the great success he saw on the show as the Director of Photography, Pletsch was first signed into this project as a gaffer. When he first became aware of the project, there was already an American cinematographer on board. Wanting to work in his native country, he took on the role of lighting technician, and offered to help the cinematographer understand Brazilian practices and translate for the Brazilian crew. However, three weeks before they were scheduled to shoot, the director, Mariana Má Thomé, approached Pletsch to take on the role of cinematographer, as the previous cinematographer could no longer do the role for personal reasons. Having already worked with Má Thomé before, and getting to truly work as a cinematographer in his home country, it all felt like destiny.

“I always like working with Ernesto because we combine the best of our abilities to make the perfect visual for the film. We get together references and break them down in visual palettes, styles and movement.
On set, our work is smooth. Most of it was already planned ahead, and I know I can trust him with his work. Ernesto loves what he does, and this can clearly be seen on screen. He is always striving for the best, and will work with all department heads to achieve the best picture. His work with light is spectacular, and for me, as a director, is lovely to see your vision on screen,” said Má Thomé.

The pilot premiered at Florianópolis, Brazil, on September 11, 2016. From there, they had two more public screenings, and had a lot of success with rave reviews from both locals and critics. Desterro is currently being negotiated with Brazilian and international networks.

“Couts” Diego Coutinho celebrates 50th anniversary of D&AD with Wish You Were Here?

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Coutinho and the crew working on Wish You Were Here?

Diego “Couts” Coutinho did not always know he would eventually be considered a top art director and motion graphics designer in his country. He started working at the age of eleven, fixing cars. A year later, he began working in a chair factory. During his time there, he learned what hard work really was, and what it meant to succeed. At the age of 20, he went to school to study graphic design. He was the first in his family to go university.

Despite his humble beginnings, Coutinho quickly became one to watch. He has been recognized worldwide for his talents, winning awards and festival selections. Yet, even with all he has achieved, for him it is still about doing what he loves.

“The art director is one of the people in charge of the project, so if it goes wrong, it’s your responsibility, but if that’s okay you’ll get your laurels too. In this position, beyond the possibility of having more space to act, I feel very stimulated with the possibilities to explore my own ideas and solutions for the project,” said Coutinho.

Coutinho’s success continued when he worked on the film Wish You Were Here? to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the famous D&AD Awards for design and advertising. Design and Art Direction (D&AD, formerly known as British Design & Art Direction) is a British educational charity which exists to promote excellence in design and advertising. Widely considered one of the most prestigious and difficult-to-win awards in design and advertising, D&AD celebrates the finest creativity each year across a diverse range of disciplines.

“It’s a dream to be part of the 50th anniversary of such an important festival and to play with such groundbreaking pieces of art direction and advertising. So, for a festival of such importance like D&AD to give us the opportunity to promote next year’s awards is fantastic,” said Coutinho.

The spot summarizes the five decades of the awards in a creative and unusual way, recalling memorable pieces of design and advertising that won the coveted pencil-shaped trophies. The over 20 references Coutinho’s team picked from the immense D&AD archives were reinterpreted, using various techniques like 2D and 3D animation, stop-motion, live-action and puppetry, all the while swapping characters and narratives between the ads. The resulting fragments were sequenced in a free-associative way, with elements from a scene “trespassing” onto the next creating a flowing, surrealistic narrative that reflects the ambiguous, unpredictable nature of memory.

“It was great to work with such creative freedom. Of all the work I usually do, this one was like the ‘cherry on top’ because of the creative freedom we had and all the extra fun we had along the way,” said Coutinho.

Wish You Were Here? went on to win multiple awards, including one from D&AD itself, the Wood Pencil for Branded Film Content & Entertainment online. It also won the Silver for Visual Language and Graphics at the Cannes Lions, the Gold for Title Sequence at Ciclope 2015, the Bronze in Motion Graphics at LIA, and the 2015 Merit Award for Broadcast & Moving Image/Animation at One Show.

02“I like the touch of mood that is important for the pacing of the film. I believe that it is fun for people in the field, who know the history of design and advertising, to try to identify all the references,” described Coutinho. “And receiving awards in many festivals for this project was an honor and a privilege.”

In this movie, Coutinho worked on the creative team, responsible for creating what would happen in the film. The storyline connects one commercial into another, and he had to think about how to merge two or three commercials in just one shot. After this, he created motion graphics and designed the posters of the movie.

“We began exploring ideas and concepts of what could turn out to be the film. After many suggestions, we got the proposal that summarizes, in a creative and unusual way, five decades of the Awards, all the while recalling memorable pieces of design and advertising that won the coveted pencil shaped trophies, mixing the commercials in a not your typical look-back piece, however,” he described. “The biggest challenge was to implement the concept of ‘let’s put mixed commercials in one spot’. The answer was gradually emerging based on associations, sometimes associations between elements in each commercial, sometimes in action or even free associations.”

The result is not a movie to be viewed from the perspective of the common market, in which technical elements as a clear identity, typesetting, and color work clearly permeate throughout the video, according to Coutinho.

“The final product asks for a moment of questioning about what is happening in the video, a fact that is obvious when we pay attention to the way how the track was built,” he said.

To create the posters, Coutinho used the same logic that was used to create the movie. He picked over some references from the D&AD archives and reinterpreted them in a fresh new way. The result of the posters come from mixing references of the Wish You Were Here? campaign, and other posters that were awarded in D&AD in the past. He used some materials that had been used in the creation of the short, and kept the references consistent with the identity of the campaign.

“Highly motivated, Diego has an amazing professional attitude that always brings a huge production value to any project he is involved,” said Diogo Kalil, a motion designer and 3D animator on the project.

You can view Coutinho’s work on the posters here, or check out the full video here.

Gabriella Spacciari shows versatility in both acting and modelling

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Gabriella Spacciari modelling for Quem Disse Berenice

Although Gabriella Spacciari started out knowing she wanted to be an actress, she always remained open to new opportunities. This how she came into modelling, and now millions of people have seen her face.

Spacciari was studying acting when she first started getting modeling jobs. Since that time, she has done a wide variety of television commercials and prints.

“Modelling is a private acting to the camera, who has the power to capture the beauty of the shapes, colors and shadows. It’s the idea of this ‘magic eye’ that is your audience of one,” said Spacciari. “I love to photograph and be photographed.”

One of Spacciari’s largest campaigns was for Pepsi, when she was in a commercial with the soccer player David Luiz. In the film, two girlfriends are ready to go out when it starts to rain. One of them almost gives up afraid of ruining her hair style. She tried to escape the rain, but it leaks on her hair. When she enters the party, the player David Luiz identifies with her.

The commercial was shot in London and directed by Pedro Pereira. The campaign was shown on TV Globo during the FIFA World Cup in 2014.

“We had a bunch of restrictions to be followed and Gabriella had the quality we were expecting for the acting to be natural, funny, with a naive seduction,” said Pereira. “Gabriella was very professional during the long hours shooting. Also, she photographs amazingly, which contributes to the success of the campaign. I’ve been seeing her on many campaigns here in Brazil and I think she´s getting her space, showing more on each project the great actress and model she is.”

One of the campaigns he is referring to is for GVT Communications. This included Veja Magazine, one of the biggest magazines in Brazil. During this time, she worked with Mabel Feres, who has worked for many brands such as Vogue and Marie Claire, and has done portraits of Andy Garcia, Anne Hathaway and Cindy Crawford, to name a few.

“Modelling is something that requires a lot of discipline and understanding, knowing what your style sells,” said Spacciari.

Spacciari has done many national campaigns in Brazil for SuperBonder, GoodEyer, Pósitron, Dupont, Óticas Carol. She has represented big brands such Dupont, Motorola and Trident. She also shot for Cultura Inglesa, which was for metro, outdoors, and schools all over Brazil, working with Patricia Mesquita and William Mello.

“It had a great range. People used to send me pictures with them and the outdoors,” she said.

She also did a make-up tutorial campaign for Quem Disse Berenice. It was at the stores nationally, and also online.

“Its huge, everybody sees it and comments on it,” said Spacciari. “It’s fun to go to a magazine stand and see yourself on it, or to be crossing the street with your actual boyfriend and seeing a bus stop with you smiling at another guy.” 

Spacciari is recognized internationally. She moved from a small city to São Paulo, and graduated in drama. She has done stage plays, and modelling jobs. She did a supporting role in the feature The Red Thread with the Mexican director Alfred Widman, as well as the leading role in the film Before Sunset I Think of You with the Chinese director Yuk Law. She was in the webseries BlackSpiderMan that went to San Francisco Comic-Con, the LA Comic Con, the Kamikaze Comic Con just last month.

“I think I discovered the capacity of overcoming barriers by working in different places and communicating with different cultures,” she concluded. “I’ve been discovering my art and been in projects that have been recognized around the world.”

 

Brazil’s Samar Kauss is a Multi-Faceted Editor, Director of Photography and Humanitarian

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Samar Kauss is a Brazilian filmmaking tour de force.

 

Brazil’s Samar Kauss has proven herself to be a filmmaker to watch, as any project she is attached to gains immeasurable success. Hailing from Brazil, Kauss has established herself as an internationally recognized editor, lending her services to some of her home country’s most distinguished productions over the past decade.

Native Brazilians may recognize her for her sustained work on the highly popular television show GNT Fashion, the Brazilian equivalent of E! News, which examines all things fashion, pop culture, and celebrity gossip. Since 2001, Kauss worked as an editor for GNT Fashion for several years, working alongside some of the country’s most notable celebrities, directors, and creatives across the entertainment industry. The show, distributed on Brazil’s leading network TV Globo, one of the country’s largest broadcast stations, reaches over 180 million homes in Brazil, rivaling that of even some of the most popular American productions.

Kauss does not let the bar lie with only one immensely popular television show, however. She has also worked as an editor for the highly popular series Mesa Para Dois, (Table For Two), a culinary series hosted by the renowned Brazilian celebrity chefs Flavia Quaresma and Alex Atala. The two chefs are nationally famous for their entertaining, yet informative series in which Kauss’ job is to propagate the show’s energetic pacing, and to support the comedic timing of the two chefs as they dive through local community’s in search for the most rich and flavorful recipes around Brazil and internationally. As a longstanding editor on the program, Kauss ran a tight ship, and was able to understand, envision, and articulate through her cuts exactly what the directors and producers of the show had in mind for the final visual product. The show’s executive producer, Alessandra Casado, had this to say: “Thanks to the tight, polished editing skills demonstrated by Samar, Mesa Para Dois was received tremendously well and garnered a substantial viewership of up to 183 million Brazilians.”

In addition to her work as an editor, Kauss also has worked hand-in-hand with the Australian government’s Department of Health as a leading Director of Photography for their government-funded educational documentary, aimed to raise international awareness and pledge support to a large and thriving aboriginal tribe known as the Wadeye Community, who live in the rural Northern Territory of Australia. The documentary has had a significant impact on the aboriginal tribes of Australia, and was hailed for its significant cultural impact across the community.

Whether it’s landing leading roles on Brazil’s leading television networks or extending her talents to a noble, humanitarian cause for Australia’s Department of Health, Editor and Director of Photography Kauss has certainly taken the international entertainment film and television industry by storm.

Actor Lucas Zaffari Overcomes All Challenges While Dubbing

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Brazilian actor Lucas Zaffari

There are many different types of acting, but the most universally recognized can often be when one is standing on a stage or in front of a camera. For Brazilian actor Lucas Zaffari, a different type of acting challenge is presented to him on a regular basis.

Zaffari dubs Spanish telenovelas into Portuguese, his native language. Dubbing, also known as revoicing, is the replacement of the voices of the original actors with a different performer in another language. To do so, Zaffari receives the video and script with all the timelines of exactly where his character speaks and reacts in an episode. He then studies those lines and goes to a sound studio to record the revoicing of his character.

“As an actor, specifically for film and television, you get all you can from circumstances that are happening around you and in your imagination. When it’s me, I try to absorb as much stimuli as I can from my acting partner, location, sometimes music, smells, senses,” he said. “But in a sound studio all you have is a cubicle with foam and the recordings that you see on the screen, and on top of that, all you have to show what your character is feeling is through your voice. It is challenging.”

Zaffari is currently cast in three telenovelas with Voxx Studios. These seven to nine month commitment are the Colombian Allá Te Espero which is soon to be completed, Venezuela’s Piel Salvaje, and the Venezuelan American Voltea Pá Que Te Enamores.

Although it is more common for Portuguese dubbing studios to be in Miami and Brazil, Voxx set up their studio in LA because they believe that is where the most talented actors are located.

“I’m really honored to know that after I joined Voxx Studios, they continued to hire me on all of their new telenovelas. It’s a great opportunity to voice different characters,” said Zaffari.

The sound booth where Zaffari works is a cubicle about eight feet by eight feet covered in foam so the sound does not reverberate, a microphone, a headphone, two televisions (one for the video and one for the lines with the proper time codes). There is also a sound-proof window that goes through to a different room where the sound engineer and the director are located.

“It can be quite hard,” described Zaffari. “You need to match your voice to the mouth of the original actor. Sometimes the Spanish is too fast and it is hard to match everything in Portuguese to that pace. Sometimes we have to change it to what people would understand instead of a perfect translation, without changing the meaning, of course.”

Zaffari describes acting as the hardest job in the world. He says that feeling as someone else is extremely challenging, but with dubbing, you do not have the capability to pull from your surroundings and react instantly to the people around you.

“Dubbing is not on location,” he said. “You are in a cubicle. You don’t have another actor to pull emotion from. Your partner is a microphone and a television. The senses I use when I am acting

I can’t use when I am dubbing. I am not there. You need to put all of those things you would normally use into your microphone and just use your voice.”

Despite the challenges that dubbing can present, there are many parts that Zaffari enjoys.

“In a way it is less stressful because you are not on camera so you can just wear your comfortable clothes,” he said. “But I really like to put a little bit of my interpretation into a character, even though it is another actor’s performance.”

Zaffari said that when he first started dubbing, he was conflicted on how to approach each character.

“Should I dub as my personal interpretation of what that character is going through? Or as the original actor’s interpretation?,” he said, describing his initial thought process. “But to me now, it is a mixture of those two things.”

Leila Vieira, Zaffari’s dubbing director for Piel Salvaje, thinks Zaffari’s mixture is working out very well.

“One of the main qualities an actor has to have in order to be good at dubbing is being able to recognize and mimic pace,” described Vieira. “Lucas has an incredible ability for listening to the dialogue and being able to reproduce it in Portuguese with perfection, making the process fast at the same time as high quality with his great acting skills. Aside from recognizing pace, acting with only your voice can be a challenge that Lucas masters with flying colors.”

Vieira believes that it is not only Zaffari’s inherent talent that makes him successful at dubbing, but also his personality as a whole.

“Lucas is the nicest person you could ever work with,” she said. “Not only he has an amazing working ethic, but he also has a great personality that accepts critiques and understands the adjustments, which makes the whole process fast and productive.”

Sebastian Zancanaro, another director at Voxx, describes Zaffari as the ultimate professional.

“I cast Lucas as Francisco (Pacho) in the dramatic soap opera Alla Te Espero and I was mesmerized by his commitment to our team and by his stamina. His unique skill as a Portuguese speaker actor in conjunction with his acting abilities make him one of our most valuable cast members,” said Zancanaro. Lucas has also being cast as Pedro in our upcoming soap opera project entitled Our Family, our longest and most prized project to date.

Zaffari says that dubbing with Voxx is a great working environment.

“It is so much fun,” he said. “There are so many nice and talented people around, which makes this creative work much more richer.”

Zaffari has no plans on slowing down.

This versatile actor has already started dubbing the new telenovela Somos Família (Our Family) as Pedro.