Tag Archives: Canadian Actors

Canada’s Aida King is worried wife and stepmother in action flick ‘Hemorrhage’

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Aida King

Being Canadian of Filipino descent and growing up in a multicultural downtown Toronto urban neighborhood, Aida King uses her prominence as an actress to be a representative of a world population sector that is still well under-represented in the entertainment industry. Her unique appearance allows her to portray a variety of cultures and she aims to provide a deeper understanding of different ethnicities. Through the creative arts, she can provide a fresh perspective and not only entertain her audiences, but also educate. With every project she takes on, no matter the genre, she makes sure to understand her character and their background, as well as what drives them. It is such a devotion that makes her such an outstanding actress, and a leader in the industry in Canada.

Known for her versatility, King has worked on a variety of genres as an actress, showing that she is capable of anything. Whether bringing on the laughs in Desert Drive or keeping you on the edge of your seats in the thriller War of Mind, this actress knows exactly how to captivate an audience.

King not only impresses audiences, but also those she works with, as seasoned Producer and Director Josh Mitchell was so moved by the actress’ work in his film The Convicted, which went on to several prestigious international film festivals, that he immediately offered her more roles on his future projects. The two also worked together on the 2015 film Hemorrhage.

Hemorrhage tells the story of a brawling hockey player who suffers from his fourth concussion and is forced to retire. He connects with a shady old high school friend and starts flipping houses, but quickly finds himself face-to-face with a dangerous Mexican gang. When they rough up his wife and kidnap his son – the gloves come off and he takes matters into his own hands.

“Everyone thinks that a pro athlete leads only a glamourous life. That being said, not all are successful as the main stars that are showcased. So many of them face their own unique set of challenges, especially if their career gets cut shorter than expected. The movie is an age-old warning to be careful of whom you associate yourself with,” said King.

Playing the lead role of Ana Chaffe, King was ready to take on a little bit of an action hero. She was a wife and step-mother that was stereotypically cautious and suspicious of her husband’s questionable associates. She was very protective of him and had been worrying about his future, ever since he was forced to retire from his professional hockey career. Her instincts turn out to be correct as she later suffers from her stepchild being kidnapped and her husband under the control of a criminal. Ana’s worry provided pivotal foreshadowing in the film, building suspense and emotionally investing the audience.

“It was a rush to play such a strong character, fighting for her husband and step-child,” said King.

While shooting Hemorrhage, King was required to handle a gun for the first time in her career. Even though it was just a prop, she found the experience quite unnerving. She researched how to shoot a gun, and despite never actually doing so, perfectly executed the scene. This was made easier because of how comfortable she was on set, extremely familiar with the entire cast and crew. However, there was a lot of testosterone on the sports fuelled action film, she joked.

“It’s such an overall different frame of mind when you’re involved in an action focused film. I enjoyed this new approach and the comradery that goes along with it. It was a great time to channel in all great angry female roles that I have seen on TV over the years,” she said.

The trailer for Hemorrhageis featured on Daily Motion‘s website, and the full film is available via Vimeo on Demand since September 2015.

“I am very proud of its outcome. The reviews have been kind and we are grateful for it,” King concluded.

 

Written by Annabelle Lee

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Anna Pniowsky masters different levels of fear to terrify audiences in ‘He’s Out There’

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Photo by Kevin McIntyre

Even at the age of 12, Anna Pniowsky understands that choosing to pursue a career as an actress would not be worth doing for the wrong reasons. It is a cutthroat field to work in and if you wish to become an actress for glamor or fame, it is unlikely that you will be able to withstand the pressure and the challenges that you will be faced with. Pniowsky knows that becoming an actress involves a type of perseverance that most individuals will never require in their lifetimes. She is always on her game, ready for any audition, callback, or role that she is tasked with. On top of that, she has mastered the ability to look self-doubt in the face and turn it away. Her love for acting transcends any obstacle that she comes across and by believing in herself and surrounding herself with people who support her dreams, she has no doubt that she will be acting for years to come.

“If you feel that acting is truly in your blood, remember the well-known adage – it is a marathon, not a sprint. It takes a lot of auditions before you book something. You will feel self-doubt and you will want to give up, but if you truly love it, you can push forward. You just have to believe in yourself,” told Pniowsky.

Despite her age, Pniowsky has earned herself a breadth of experience and training in her field. Just this past year, she landed the lead role in a film written, directed, and starred in by Oscar-winning actor Casey Affleck. The film, Light of My Life, is a drama about a father (played by Affleck) and his daughter (played by Pniowsky) who live on the outskirts of a society that was destroyed by a pandemic ten years ago. Buzz about Pniowsky’s role in the film is already gaining traction as being a career-defining moment for the talented young actress and audiences everywhere are eager to see what happens when it premieres.

Prior to filming Light of My Life, Pniowsky won the role of Kayla in Sony Screen Gems’ horror film, He’s Out There. He’s Out There depicts the terrifying tale of a mother and her two daughters who take a vacation to a remote lake house and wind up being tormented by a murderer in the woods. In the film, Pniowsky acted alongside celebrated actress Yvonne Strahovski, as well as her little sister, Abby. She was paramount to the film’s storyline and appears in the entire duration of the film. In order to play her character as convincingly as possible, Pniowsky endeavored to master multiple different ways of appearing frightened. Since her character is scared throughout the entirety of the film, she felt it was very important to develop her character to be dynamic and she avoided appearing one-dimensional at all costs. With that, she developed various different levels of fear that she could transition back and forth between, depending on the intensity of the scene. In doing so, she created a character that audiences can relate to, and ideally, will identify with as they embark upon the journey that the film aims to take them on.

The film’s director, Dennis Iliadis, could not have been more pleased with Pniowsky’s performance. Knowing that the quality of the film rested entirely on the performance of his cast, he was determined to find actresses that could emulate the mood of the film directly into its audience. When asked about Pniowsky’s performance, Iliadis had the following to say:

“Anna was phenomenal to work with. For such a young age, she’s an actress of incredible intelligence, sensibility and instinct. I have never worked with a young actor or actress who is so hard working, disciplined and focused. We had a very emotionally demanding and technically difficult shoot but in those very challenging conditions, Anna gave a great performance in a role of strenuous physicality and very complex and heightened emotions. Even in the most difficult situations, Anna was always prepared, always ready to go. She really made the rest of us up our game.”

After wrapping He’s Out There, Pniowsky gained a new appreciation for the horror film genre. Most mainstream horror films today have one goal and that is to terrify an audience. It is rare, however, to be able to act in a horror film with an underlying moral compass. Pniowsky was fortunate enough to be able to identify the deeper meanings that the story tells. Not only is it a story that highlights the unrelenting strength of a mother’s love for her children, it also does an excellent job of emphasizing a journey of personal growth in Pniowsky’s character. She found herself inspired by the presence of strong, female characters in the film and feels that young girls can learn a lot from Kayla’s will and determination to survive. She loved seeing strong female characters taking charge and fighting hard for what they believe in. It is a message that women of all ages can carry with them beyond the film and into their own personal lives and Pniowsky was honored to be able to play a role in helping foster that movement.

Q&A with leading Canadian actor Darren Eisnor

Originally from a small town in Ontario, Canada, Darren Eisnor did not grow up aspiring to be an actor. It came to him suddenly, in an epiphany of sorts, and since that moment, he has never wanted anything else. Now, he is one of Canada’s top young actors, and he is quickly taking the globe by storm.

In many captivating performances, such as the films Holiday Joy and Early Release, as well as the acclaimed television show Anne with an E, Eisnor has gained fans from all over the world., and audiences are looking forward to his performance in the upcoming Syfy horror flick Never Knock. Currently, he is starring in the popular Blackpills series Skal, an enthralling story about the water disappearing across the planet overnight. To read more about the series, Eisnor’s career, and his life, check out the interview below!

IFR: What do you like about being an actor?

 DE: I get to be super cool. When people ask me what I do, and I say that I’m an actor as a career, they automatically assume I’m a cool guy. So that’s pretty cool. Really though, if you can get some lucky breaks and manage to carve a career out of the whole thespian thing, it is a ton of fun and incredibly liberating in a few ways. I’m the kind of guy who bounces around from friend group to friend group, and I’m always diving headfirst into new interests, as I like to keep things fresh and experience as much as possible in this life. Acting meshes rather well with that state of mind, because I get to become all sorts of different people in all sorts of different lives, and if I convince the right people that I’m really like those people – then I get paid for it!

It can be a great life experience for me to look at the world through all these different perspectives, even if it’s just for an audition or two and I don’t end up getting the part. We humans are such interesting and multi-faceted creatures, but I don’t think everyone gets the chance or has the courage to explore all their dimensions. Of course, there are some dark and dangerous sides to us as well, that are probably best left for the actors (and the Mixed Martial Artists). It really is a privilege to even have the opportunity to compete for all these roles that I go out for, and I am grateful for that.

When I first started training as an actor, it actually helped me in a therapeutic way. I didn’t realize how many emotional walls I had built up over the years, and I think this is especially prevalent among young men, and even more so for young men like me who were competitive athletes for most of their life. I actually think there is a fair argument for the building of these walls, because life is almost always very hard to tackle, and the battlefield of life can be easier to navigate if you are able to have a firm grip on your emotions. However, acting is a forum for the human condition to express itself, and to be successful and great at this profession, it seems to me that one must truly elevate emotional intelligence to a higher level of understanding and vulnerability.

IFR: Why did you want to work on Skal?

DE: Skal piqued my interest with its post-apocalyptic world, something that’s fascinated me in stories like The Walking Dead, or the Fallout video game series. At first, I auditioned for the role of Arthur, the outright leading role of the series. Arthur is a bit of a nerd, but he’s charismatic enough to operate a YouTube channel with three million subscribers. I submitted a tape that I really nailed down in terms of performance, and was really excited. The scenes they requested for the audition helped a lot in that regard, ranging from comical and cool, to raging and teary-eyed. I got a callback for it – but for the role of “Ylane”, which was a soon-to be-changed French name from the original French short film the series is based on. The character is Arthur’s best friend and manager, and an integral character within the series.

My agent set up a Skype session with the writer/director who is from France, Benjamin Cappelletti, who explained to me that my original audition was great, but I didn’t look enough like his vision of Arthur. He went on to say that I looked like a great “Ylane.” Luckily, I was able to flesh out this character into someone with some dark humanity, and they casted me! They even renamed the character “Darren” which was pretty cool, since I’m not sure if I’ll get the chance to play my own name again.

IFR: What was it like working on Skal?

DE: Working on Skal was an outstanding career experience for me. Living in Montreal for about a month during this shoot really made me feel a sense of independence. Of course, it came with the great responsibility of carrying a lot of the burden of the show’s success on my shoulders, which was more than welcome on my end. This was exactly what I’d be looking forward to, and I wasn’t about to back down now that it was staring me down.

Darren was an interesting character to play. In the first episode, before the apocalyptic world is born, Darren is a bit of an arrogant showman, talking all sorts of big game to the hottest girls in the room. That said, he felt relatively happy and content in his materialistic world. But when all the bodies of water in the world dry up, he immediately adapts a “kill or be killed” mindset. While it’s easy to condemn that sort of regression, it’s easy for me to understand why someone would fall into that way of thinking in that sort of world. Although there are times when it seems Darren is being overly aggressive, often it’s hard to disagree with his sentiment in a world where you can’t trust anyone, or take any chances.

Every villain is a hero in the story of their mind, and that’s how I took ownership of Darren when he makes decisions that may seem wrong on the surface. There is one particular part of the series where I wish Darren were a little more heroic, but I remained entirely understanding of his motive of self-preservation. I think there’s also an automatic connection with a character when he has the same name as you – and when the other characters address me as “Darren” there is an added element of personalization.

I also tried to get into character for one particular series of events by going without food for a day or so. It was definitely tough turning down lunch that day on set, but at least the last meal I had before all that was a delicious all-you-can-eat sushi brunch!

IFR: What was your character like?

DE: The role of Darren is important to the story, firstly as Arthur’s best friend and Emma’s romantic interest. There’s an awkward love triangle going on where Arthur lusts for Emma, but never makes any moves on her. Darren is far from low on confidence, so him and Emma have been going at it for a while, and it really irritates Arthur – even after all the water dries up, and the apocalypse creeps on in. After survival mode kicks in, Darren and Emma clash often. Emma has an empathetic desire to help as many people as she can, but Darren understands that there is too much danger to risk the group, especially after they come across a huge stash of water bottles that could keep them alive long enough to figure out what the hell’s going on in the world.

The group runs into two other people named Frank (a police officer) and Malika (a nurse). Frank misleads the group when he comes into first contact with them, and Darren never trusts him again after that. There are many fiery exchanges while they try to escape the dangerous city, but as the season crosses the halfway point, tragedy strikes, and the pack is split up. Darren becomes a prisoner of a violent gang of brutal men. With his life fully in jeopardy, his every action has extremely high weight to it. In season two, I think I will be exploring an even darker side of Darren if we keep the fun rolling.

IFR: What was it like working with such an all-star cast?

DE: It’s important for there to be a good chemistry between cast members, especially when a group forms in the show and your characters spend a lot of time interacting with each other. Everyone got along really well, and really put their best foot forward with their performances in Skal.

In terms of performance, it was superb. Evan Marsh (who plays Arthur) was a consistent rock in the center of the production, and there’s one particularly powerful scene where we really pushed each other to emotional peaks. Oliva Scriven (Emma) managed to tolerate an intense make out scene with me, so kudos to her for that. She’s very popular on social media for her role on Degrassi, so it was nice to have her bring some viewers on board with that. Trevor Hayes (Frank) and Mariah Inger (Malika) were playing characters that “Darren” viewed as outsiders, and didn’t trust, and there were some great heated interactions between us on screen – especially Frank, the hard-nosed cop who doesn’t take too kindly to Darren’s big mouth.

Shawn Baichoo played a late-season villain named Pablo, who is a leader of a violent gang. I only got to work with him for a short period of time, but he really brought his A-game and played a convincing madman. They gave him a contact lens that made it look like he had a white “dead eye”, which added to the aura of evil. We had some intense scenes that he totally owned and showed a possession of confident power. I should also mention that little Chelsea Goldwater, who played a young child prisoner, helped add to the creepiness of the scenes.

This project was Benjamin Cappelletti’s “baby”. He’d been pushing this story for a while as a young filmmaker in France, and it was great to help bring his vision to life. His passion for Skal was evident, and even though there were a few moments of language barriers, we were able to communicate together and get the scenes done to his satisfaction.

IFR: The series premieres on the streaming app Blackpills. How do you think streaming websites have opened the doors for actors such as yourself?

DE: Well, obviously there is more opportunity than ever for an actor with all these new avenues of distribution. In the past, films were limited to festivals and cinema, while television series were limited to cable and satellite subscriptions. Now there are all sorts of streaming avenues out there for episodic series and films alike, and the opportunity to get quality productions made has never been greater.

I’m very grateful for the opportunity to have a leading role in Skal, and it will be interesting to see how Blackpills performs overall as a company. It seems they are aiming to get a firm grip on the mobile-streaming game, as their app is currently only available for mobile devices as opposed to TVs. I haven’t had the chance to observe many of the other shows on their app, but they have already granted out several second season renewals for some of them, so there is certainly a chance for us to get back at it. At the very least, the show is of high-quality and makes for solid demo footage to show other productions what I can do with a meaty role.

Blackpills also stands out with the brevity of each of their shows’ episodes; the average runtime for an episode of Skal was about nine minutes long. Today’s generation operate very much from an extreme lack of attention span, so this format is designed quite well with that in mind. Here’s hoping it works out!

Anja Ellam captivates audiences with her writing of new film “The Woods”

There is one thing about her that shines above all else: she is an entertainer. She is extremely multi-talented, and uses her writing and acting skills to captivate audiences around the world, whether through film, YouTube, or various social media platforms. There is truly no limit to what she can accomplish.

Ellam has tens of thousands of followers on her Instagram, with a strong impact on Twitter as well, and as an influencer has helped many companies and shows gain a following and audience. Working with AwesomenessTV, both her writing and influencing skills have boosted the show to have millions of views. With the extremely popular app, the ArsenicTV Snapchat story gets over 500,000 views daily, and as a host and influencer for the show, Ellam is a large part of that. However, it was with the film The Woods where Ellam’s impressive natural writing talents became truly evident to worldwide audiences.

“Relationships between siblings can be complicated, especially if they’re teenagers. I wanted to show why the older sister in the film was so angry, because this is a common conflict between sisters,” said Ellam.

The Woods tells the story of two sisters at a party, who get lost in the woods while leaving. The film is about two sisters who get lost in the woods while leaving a party. They quickly realize they’re lost and will have to work together to get out, and push through the fighting and angst between them.

“I wanted to do something simple: two characters, one location,” Ellam described. “The sisters’ relationship is based on my sisters and my relationship.”

Ellam wrote the film entirely by herself. Originally, she wanted to experiment with her writing and work on a project that her friends could be a part of. She wrote the script while trying to think of the simplest way to make a short, but the story developed the more she wrote.

“The story is all dialogue driven which is a fun challenge for me as a writer. I also ended up directing it, which is something I’m not familiar with but my team believed in me, and I did know the script and the vision, so I hope the viewers can see it too,” she said.

Viewers definitely see the vision. The film has gone on to be shown at several prestigious international film festivals.  After premiering at the UK Monthly Film Festival, Ellam won the new filmmakers award at the Mediterranean Film Festival (MedFF). It also was just selected as a semi-finalist for the Miami Epic Trailer Festival.

“It’s a really amazing feeling that the film has been so well-received. It’s one thing to write something that people like ,but actually making it and still having people want to watch it is really cool. I know that sounds weird to say, but we did this on a very small budget with only one shooting day. It’s nerve racking because if something doesn’t work it’s almost like you can’t redo it. I’m glad people think we were able to do a good job. It’s had to get your vision across so I’m glad people saw what we were going for,” Ellam said.

All those that worked with Ellam on the film immediately saw that she was an extraordinary writer, and all of the success that the film has received could never have been possible without the vision and talent she brought with her. Maxwell Peters, a Los Angeles based Screenwriter, Director, and Producer, produced The Woods. He says her commitment to the film made it the success that is it.

“Over the course of the past two years I’ve worked with Anja on multiple projects. Most recently I produced her short film The Woods, which she wrote and directed. Anja is easy to work with and had a firm grasp on what she was doing. She worked with her actors with ease and was able to get wonderful performances out of all of them, aside from that she was able to work with crew in an effective and efficient manner,” said Peters.

Even without all the accolades and awards, the experience of writing The Woods was unforgettable for Ellam. She knew what she wanted to do from the beginning, and using her creativity, she was able to make something unforgettable for audiences as well. The film even has a twist ending, which was just plain fun for Ellam to write.

“I liked writing the ending the best. I didn’t know how I was going to end it at first, but I knew I wanted it to be unexpected. I had a lot of fun experimenting with different ending options,” said Ellam. “I took this ending honestly because I think happy endings are boring. I considered having them not make it out but I thought leaving it a little more open ended was a bit more surprising. I love twist endings.”

Be sure to check out what happens to the two sisters by seeing Ellam’s fabulous work in The Woods.

The CW Keeps Actor Nathan Mitchell Busy With Several Hit Shows

Nathan Mitchell
Actor Nathan Mitchell

 

From hit teen shows to action-packed dramas Canadian-born actor Nathan Mitchell has become a recognizable face on some of The CW’s most popular television shows, and it’s no wonder why—the guy’s got a lot of talent.

Over the last decade we’ve watched Mitchell break Lindsey Shaw’s (“Pretty Little Liars,” “Temps”) character Claire Tolchuck’s heart on “Aliens in America,” battle it out with Colton Hayes (“San Andreas,” “Teen Wolf”) aka Arsenal on the DC Comics inspired series “Arrow” and take on polarizing roles on both sides of justice in the series “Tomorrow People” and “iZombie.”

Ironically enough, Mitchell actually got his start on the small screen on The CW series “Aliens in America” where he played the recurring lead role of Jeffrey, an amiable high school jock who’s the on again off again boyfriend of Claire Tolchuck. Over the course of the first season we watch the two go back and forth falling in and out love with that hot and cold style that’s so characteristic of most high school relationships. At first Tolchuck tries to dump Mitchell’s character in an effort to raise her social status and find a more popular beau, but it doesn’t stick.

“Like any sophomore in love, I waited on her lawn and blasted ‘In Your Eyes’ till she came down and gave me a nice PG hug,” recalls Mitchell.

The two make it work for a little while, but like many high school boys, Jeffrey eventually decides he needs more freedom.

Mitchell says, “I decided she was too clingy so I ended it in between classes. Nice and clean. She was crying but I was cool, so whatevs. Playing the character was a blast!”

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Nathan Mitchell as Jeffrey in “Aliens in America”

“Aliens in America” couldn’t have been a better jumping off point for Mitchell’s career, as we got to see the actor take his character from being a lovable stud to a nonchalant ass hole. Proving his dynamic talent, Mitchell takes the character from someone we immediately adore and transforms him into one that is easy to hate, making Jeffrey relevant and relatable to the show’s massive teen following.

In stark contrast to Jeffrey on “Aliens in America,” Mitchell went on to play a significantly more vile character on the Joey Award winning series “The Tomorrow People.” In the action-filled sci-fi series a group of young people who possess psionic powers as a result of human evolution are forced to keep their abilities a secret or risk being imprisoned and exploited by Ultra. Mitchell comes into the mix as one of Ultra’s key agents in the first season of the series, and he’s definitely one badass the Tomorrow People do not want on their trail. Comparing how intimidating his character is on “The Tomorrow People” to Jeffrey in “Aliens in America” it’s surprising that they are played by the same actor, from his mannerisms to the way he carries himself, Mitchell is that good at morphing himself into different characters.

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Nathan Mitchell in “The Tomorrow People”

One of his most popular CW roles to date though is Isaac Stanzler, the bitter and abandoned protégé of Wildcat on the Leo and Prism Award winning series “Arrow.” In the show’s third season we get to see Mitchell put on his villain’s mask and battle gear and get into a nasty brawl with Arsenal aka Roy Harper in a tell-tale interaction that foreshadows the series’ thickening plot. Mitchell is clearly a force to be reckoned with on screen when it comes to action.

“Isaac’s showdown with Roy was epic… The fighting sequences were off the chart,” says Mitchell.

After Mitchell’s character commits a series of bloody murders in a ploy to frame Wildcat and get revenge for past pain, he encounters Arsenal who puts a stop to it all in an intense battle scene that keeps us on our toes.

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Colton Hayes (left) and Nathan Mitchell (right) duking it out on “Arrow”

Mitchell’s most recent spot on The CW was in season 2 of the comedy crime drama “iZombie,” which aired earlier this year. Earning a Teen Choice Award nomination last year, as well as a Joey Award nomination this year, “iZombie” follows Olivia Moore played by Rose McIver (“Masters of Sex,” “Once Upon a Time”), a medical student who, after being turned into a zombie, finds a way to use her unique circumstances to help the police solve crimes around the city.

Mitchell first appears in the series powerful season 2 finale in a crucial role as a law enforcement squad leader who leads his team into the Super Max Rager research facility after a group of young researchers take a pill that turns them into bloodthirsty zombies. We see Mitchell take charge as he dashes through the doors of the building and orders Moore, Detective Babineaux and Major to vacate the building so he can clean up the mess.

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Nathan Mitchell in “iZombie”

Audiences will also be able to catch Nathan Mitchell in a recurring role as a mercenary in season 3 of “iZombie,” which is slated to air on The CW in 2017.

From playing the high school stud to an embittered criminal, as well as several roles as dominating characters in positions of power, Mitchell has done a brilliant job of transforming himself to fit whatever the project calls for; and thanks to his unparalleled talent and undeniable good looks, audiences around the world can bet on seeing a whole lote more from the Canadian actor for many years to come.

Actor Profile: Veteran Actor Cory Dagg

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Canadian Actor Cory Dagg

 

Over the years Canadian actor Cory Dagg has brought his unparalleled talent to a pretty astonishing list of film and television productions. Becoming known for his roles on hit television shows like “The Andromeda Strain,” “Top Cops” and “Street Legal,” as well as films such as Primetime Emmy nominee Brad Turner’s “The Inspectors,” Michael Kennedy’s action-packed crime film “Hostile Force” and “Bond of Silence” acting alongside Kim Raver from “24” and “Grey’s Anatomy,” Dagg’s proven that he has a unique gift for playing authoritative roles just as easily as he plays the underdog.

With a character list spanning the likes of government officials, sly detectives and frustrated public defenders, Dagg’s way of communicating with his eyes is something that has made each and every character he’s taken on to date unforgettable. His role as Detective Peters in the series premiere of Columbia Tristar’s thriller series “The Net” is one that not only helped carve out his reputation for portraying multi-layered characters in the crime genre, but also set up the basis for the show.

While out for a run early one morning, freelance computer programmer Angela Bennett (played by Brooke Langton) is arrested by federal agents only to find out once in the interrogation room that her identity has been erased and replaced with that of a wanted felon. Dagg’s character Detective Peters comes down hard on Bennett who is both baffled and afraid as Peters threatens her with a lengthy jail sentence for crimes she didn’t commit.  

“Whenever I get a new role, I get to know that character as if they were going to be my new best friend. I try to think of every aspect of them – how they feel, how they would respond in certain situations, what they would say,” explains Dagg.

“With Peters being a cop, I knew I could handle that since I ‘ve done a lot of cops and military roles. But Peters is a bit of a dirty cop, so I had to dig deep to bring that out in him. Really, it comes down to immersing myself in the character, finding something – anything – I might have in common with him, and playing on that.”

Another of Dagg’s authoritative style characters that has left an indelible mark in the minds of viewers is that of General Michaelson on the seven Primetime Emmy Award nominated series “The Andromeda Strain,” which was adapted from Michael Crichton’s 1969 novel and produced by four-time Oscar nominee Ridley Scott. The four-part series follows a group of highly trained scientists as they work to find the source of what killed the inhabitants of a small town and a way to stop it, and the military team tasked with keeping the disaster under wraps as a matter of national security.

Acting alongside Benjamin Bratt (“Miss Congeniality,” “Despicable Me 2”) who plays Dr. Jeremy Stone and Golden Globe Award winner Ricky Schroder (“Get Him to the Greek,” “NYPD Blue”) who plays Major Bill Keane MD, Cory Dagg gave a brilliant performance as General Michaelson, the military leader who is charged with quarantining the affected area from the mysterious virus, and keeping the rest of the population safe.

Interestingly enough, Dagg originally auditioned for a smaller role on the series however, after director Mikael Salomon (“Hard Rain”) saw Dagg’s performance, he was given a much meatier role and his character went on to be featured in three of the series’ four episodes.

“The director said later he was surprised I didn’t have military experience, that’s how convincing he thought I was,” recalls Dagg. “It’s the dramatic roles I love the most, when the stakes are really high I’m able to separate myself from other actors and usually get the role.”

As an actor Cory Dagg effortlessly stands out in a crowd thanks to his magnetic presence both on and off camera, his rare versatility, and his ability to breathe life into the most complex characters, all of this and more have been crucial factors in the impressive career he has created for himself over the past 30 years, and we can’t wait to see what he takes on next!

 

Q & A with Dynamic Actress Erica Deutschman!

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Canadian Actress Erica Deutschman shot by Karen Benedict

Today audiences around the world will probably recognize actress Erica Deutschman best from her role as Beth in the dramatic fantasy series Being Human, where she transforms from the innocent girl next door to an eerie hauntress who makes the main character’s life unbearable. Never failing to captivate her audience, Deutschman’s impressive range coupled with her drop dead gorgeous looks have made her a leading lady for a long list of film and television productions across genres including The Howling Reborn, Hidden, Reign, Fatal Vows, Blue Mountain State, Sex Addict/Love Addict and others.

Earlier in her career Deutschman starred in Christos Sourligas dramatic feature film Happy Slapping, which premiered at the Montreal International Film Festival in 2011.

According to The Hollywood Reporter the film was the world’s first feature length project to be shot entirely using Apple’s iPhone 4. Happy Slapping revolved around five suburban teens that roam the streets at night attacking random victims and recording the assaults with their phones. Deutschman’s character Belle, who’s the polar opposite of most of the characters the actress has taken on over the years, was the antagonizing one of the bunch who continually eggs the other four, upping the ante and leading each action to be more atrocious than the one before.

Shortly after the release of Happy Slapping Deutschman went on to guest star on the hit television show Lost Girl, as well as A Stranger in My Home, before landing the recurring role of Beth on SyFy’s multi-award winning series Being Human. This year Deutschman wrapped production on multi-award winning director Deepa Mehta’s film Beeba Boys, which was chosen as an Official Selection of the prestigious 2015 Toronto International Film Festival where it had it’s world premier on September 13.

While Deutschman has undoubtedly made her name known as an actress in hit film and television productions, she has also proven her capacity to command the stage through her roles in high-profile theatre productions including “Nutcracker,” “Sleeping Beauty,” “Coppelia,” and “The Comedy of Love and War.”

With a collective body of work that spans the gamut, Deutschman has displayed herself as the kind of actress who can take on virtually any role with ease and natural finesse. The actress is currently working on the upcoming comedy series Cross Rhodes where she will take on the starring role of Erica Rhodes.

To find out more about her and what’s next on the horizon for this talented Canadian beauty make sure to check out our interview below. You can also find out about more of her work on screen through her IMDb page: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm4264669/

 

Where are you from? 

ED: I’m from Montreal, Canada.

When and how did you get into acting?

ED: I always knew I wanted to be an actress. I must have been 6 when I decided that it was my dream. But I was first a ballet dancer, and so I waited on the acting thing until I was 18, which is when I got an agent and really started doing it professionally.

Can you tell us about some of the film projects you’ve done?

ED: One of the film projects that I am most excited about is an indie I did in Montreal called Happy Slapping. It was the super gritty project with some really well developed and troubled characters. I played Belle; one of the five leads in the film. She is a party girl with a troubled family life, who turns to her vices too often for solace and definitely has a lot of issues but, she is also very charming and lots of fun.

Playing Belle was crazy, it’s sort of like exploring a side of yourself that doesn’t exist but when you think of certain scenarios, you wonder if it could really come out. I got to play and have lots of fun, but I also had to find this darkness and this trouble within and I really enjoyed doing that work. She completes part of the puzzle in this story, she is a bad influence on the kids around her and she pushes them into doing things that they might not be completely comfortable with—things they may even regret.

Mostly all of the shoots during the production were night shoots and we were exhausted a lot of the time, so by the time of the wrap party, I was passed out by midnight. I just couldn’t wait to sleep through the night again. But I wouldn’t change my experience for anything and I made some lifelong friends in the process. I look back on it really fondly. Look for Happy Slapping on IMDb and iTunes!!

My latest project was Academy Award nominated director Deepa Metah’s film, Beeba Boys. I played one of the boy’s girlfriends at the beginning of the film. First of all, what an awesome movie! It’s about the Sikh gangs in British Columbia and it follows their intense pursuit for power no matter what it takes. It was so exciting to work with Deepa Mehta, she’s insanely talented and I’m a really big fan of hers. The film premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, and that’s something that I’m really proud of.

How about television projects?

ED: My favorite television project I’ve worked on has to be Being Human. It shot in my home city of Montreal and it was an awesome set to be on and a really cool project to be a part of. I recurred in seasons 2 through 4 and I played a ghost who was killed by Aidan, the vampire, and I come back to haunt him throughout the rest of the series. Not only was it a really fun and sassy role to play, but it was also great to get to know all of the amazing cast and crew we got to collaborate with. It was a really excellent experience.

Being Human PhotoImogen Hayworth and Connor Price
Still shot of actors Imogen Hayworth (left), Connor Price and Erica Deutschman (right)  in “Being Human”

You get approached all the time to work on projects with people, what makes you pick one role over another?

ED: What I look for in a project is first and foremost an interesting character. The parts that I enjoy playing the most are characters that either have a sordid past or interesting personality. Of course that requires good writing, but when I read something and think I can really make it my own, that’s when I get the most excited.

What as been your most challenging role?

ED: I think my most challenging role was Belle in Happy Slapping. She had so many dimensions underneath and it was definitely challenging to be able to portray all of that. I find that it makes a character so much more interesting when you give them layers and as challenging as it can be, character development is so important for the general outcome of the film.

What is your favorite genre to work in as an actor?

ED: I would have to say that my favorite genre not only to watch but also to play in is comedy. I am currently working on a really funny series called Cross Rhodes. I would say one of my favorite things to do as an actress, and in general, is to make people laugh! And in comedy, I get to laugh and make people laugh. I just get so much joy out of it, as you should.

Can you list some of the theatre projects you’ve participated in up until now, and the roles you’ve played? From your perspective how does performing in the theatre differ from performing in on camera projects?

ED: I haven’t done theatre in a little while but as a young dancer, I did productions of the “Nutcracker” for eight consecutive years. I actually snagged the lead role of Clara when I was in high school. I also got to perform on stage a bunch when I was in school, which was a really awesome experience. I got to play the leading lady in “Commedia dell’arte,” the leading part in our Christmas Wishes Play, since I am bilingual, I also got to perform in all the French productions that we put on and in my last year, and I won the school’s drama award! As much as I enjoyed theatre though, my real passion is in film and television. I love the realism it captures and it’s also nice that you get to do more than one take so you can try different things.

What separates you from other actors? What are your strongest qualities?

ED: I think to be an actor, first and foremost, you have to have really tough skin. You have to let things roll off your back because with all the amazing parts you do get, there will also be a lot of really cool parts that you don’t get. The most important thing is to believe when one door closes another door opens and that some amazing opportunities are right around the corner. I think the fact that I’ve never lost sight of why I’m doing what I’m doing is also another key to surviving in this industry. Because at the end of the day, no matter how competitive it gets and no matter how critical some people can be, it is what I love to do so that’s really all that matters.

I’ve also been training for a really long time. A quality that I possess is that I really love going to class, learning from others and a desire to continue to grow as an actor. I think I’ve grown a lot over the past few years and I also know that I will continue to grow as an actor in the future. I think it’s really important to stay sharp by continuing to work, and I think that’s what really gives me my edge.

Have you been in any commercials?

ED: I have been in a bunch of commercials over the years. Actually, my first real project as a professional actor was a promo video for D-Box, you know, those movie theatre seats that move. That was so cool, because I didn’t have to audition. My agent called me up and was like ‘The D-Box people saw your demo on my website, they love your enthusiasm, they’re going to get you in the union.’ It was awesome, thank you D-Box!

I also did a PSA to raise awareness about rape for the Canadian Women’s Foundation, and commercials for Tax Free Credit Report, Samcon condos, as well as a couple videogames with UB Soft and Gameloft… I’m pretty much all over the map.

What projects do you have coming up?

ED: I am very very excited to announce my upcoming series Cross Rhodes. We just got the green light on it and we actually start shooting tomorrow! I play a character named Erica Rhodes (which is where the series gets its witty title) and she plays an actress who is followed by a documentary film crew. It’s a mockumentary, which is one of my favorite types of comedy so it’s basically a dream come true. My friend Jesse and I have been working on it becoming reality for about a year now, so the fact that it’s actually happening and we get to work with so many amazing actors as well, is just so fantastic.

What do you hope to achieve in your career as an actor?

ED: I’m headed to LA for my next round of pilot season in January and I’m psyched because I also get to work on a really cool indie film while I’m out there called Ice. I can’t say much more than that about the project, but I think it’s going to be really cool, no pun intended. I just want to go out and work on as much as I can and continue to learn from some more great directors and fellow actors. It’s hard to put into words how much I would like to achieve, but at the moment the sky is the limit and I am very excited to see what kind of projects will be coming my way. I would love to do a funny movie next, seeing as that is my favorite genre and I think I have a knack for it.

Why is acting your passion and chosen profession?

ED: Before I had ever acted professionally, I knew it was what I wanted to do. There was something about the way movies and television made me feel that made me decide I needed to be a part of the magic. Every since my first job up until now, there is no better feeling for me than being on set. I love the environment, the people and the whole process. As an actor, you work so hard on your off time, it is so exciting when you also get to show the world what you can do. There is no better feeling than booking that big part you wanted and once you do have it, challenging yourself and pushing yourself to be the best version of that character that you can be. I could go on, but that’s basically it in a nutshell.