From Class Clown to International Actor, Daniel DelHoyo

In film, theater and television, it’s the writers who create the characters; their personas, their lines and even their fates are predetermined, written down before cameras ever start rolling. But it requires a skilled actor to embody a fictional hero or villain, and there is nobody more skilled in personifying a character than Daniel DelHoyo. Building on the foundation of the writer’s words, DelHoyo immerses himself in his roles. Through him, words on a page come to life and become the living, breathing manifestation of the writer’s creative vision.

Born in Mexico City, DelHoyo’s love of performance began in high school when an opportunity arose for him to write, direct and act in a production showcased to an audience of his peers. The experience awoke in him an immense talent, which had been lying dormant. DelHoyo’s charisma and witty humor had long been recognized by his peers, but the play marked his first foray into drama and serious performance. From the moment he first sat down to write the script, he realized he was destined to pursue a career as an actor.

“As soon as I started writing the story I felt connected and fully plugged into this world like I had never felt with anything else,” DelHoyo recalled. “The play ended up being presented among the best ones at the drama competition in school, and from that moment I knew I wanted to act.”

Since those early days, he has become one of the most sought after actors in the business. Though there was a time when he applied his natural charm and jovial personality almost exclusively to comedic endeavors as a sort of class clown, he has far exceeded that old niche. Now, there is no production mood or genre he cannot expertly adapt to, and he is as at home in the horror and suspense genres as in comedy. His latest role as Danny in “Por Sofia” is a perfect example of how diverse his talents are.

 A tale of intrigue and an endless pursuit of justice, “Por Sofia” follows a detective intent on solving a decades-old murder. The film stars Kary Musa (“Iron Man 3,” “What Lies Beyond… The Beginning”) as Alexa, a young woman whose mother’s murder 20 years earlier continues to haunt her. DelHoyo delivers a knockout performance as Danny, a night shift server at a restaurant and one of the detective’s prime suspects in the crime.

Jack Elliot
Still of Daniel DelHoyo (left) & Mauricio Mendoza (right) in “Por Sofia” shot by Jack Elliot

The director of “Por Sofia,” Alfredo Ibarra (“Classroom 6,” “Processing”), chose to cast actors in the film who had personalities similar to those of their characters. DelHoyo, however, was an exception. But playing a character so different from himself is his wheelhouse, and the challenge allowed him to exhibit his invaluable gift for shining brilliantly when pushed out of his comfort zone.

“[Alfredo Ibarra] wants you to be yourself and deliver your own persona and emotions to the story. During the pre-production I would ask him questions and he would just answer back ‘What would you do?’” said DelHoyo, explaining how he adapted to the role. “My character is a very quiet and mysterious guy, which I’m really not. But throughout the shooting I realized what Alfredo wanted, and toward the end it all made sense. I learned that the more you trust the people you work with, the better results you’ll deliver performance-wise.”

The intense twists and turns in “Por Sofia” ensure audiences remain firmly on the edge of their seats, and DelHoyo’s gripping portrayal of Danny is an absolute marvel of suspense that keeps viewers questioning his guilt until the very end. The film is in post-production and will be released early this year.

 One of DelHoyo’s most fascinating roles, and the one he says is his favorite, was in the 2015 film “Ilusiones SA,” an adaptation of Spanish author and playwright Alejandro Casona’s 1949 play “Los Árboles Mueren de Pie.” His character, known only as Mailman, is part of a shadowy-yet-benevolent organization called The Illusionists. The group specializes in staging well-meaning hoaxes and deceptions and is comprised of equally mysterious codenamed figures, such as The Director, played by Jaime Camil (“Jane the Virgin”). The film tells the story of a man who commissions the group’s services to keep his wife from learning that their grandson has died en route to visit them.

Ilusiones SA film
Daniel DelHoyo as the Mailman in “Ilusiones SA” shot by Serguei Saldivar

 “My character is essential to the story,” DelHoyo excitedly explained. “The grandpa hires The Illusionists to set up a whole scenario with a fake grandson. My character delivers the letter to the grandpa, letting him know that his ‘grandson’ and his ‘grandson’s fiancé’ will be getting there in a couple of days.”

As an exceptionally dedicated and professional performer, DelHoyo was determined to do the role justice. He went to great lengths to embody the part and in the process put the role ahead of his own safety.

“The script is very adamant about the Mailman being exhausted. It’s been a long hot day of work for him, and it’s not over. So, as a perfectionist, I run back and forth on my bike in pretty intense morning heat, added push-ups to get my blood flow pumped-up, and did running sprints too,” said DelHoyo, describing what he called a funny experience. “We do take one and by the end of it I’m practically suffocated, sweating so much my uniform is soaking wet, and feeling sick.”

In preparation, DelHoyo completely immersed himself in the role. His sleepless nights were spent studying 1950’s Campeche, Mexico, the film’s setting, and listening exclusively to music played in the region during that era. He even went so far as to volunteer at the Post Office to better understand the character. Over 1,000 people auditioned for the role, but that level of commitment is what made him the obvious choice. It’s also what made his character so memorable and integral to the film. “Ilusiones SA” was released in Oct. 2015 to audiences in Mexico, and will be released in the U.S. later this year.

There are actors who are defined by a role, and there are roles that are defined by the actor, and careers often hinge on this subtle distinction. Daniel DelHoyo is without question the latter, an asset to every production whose chameleon-like talent for transformation has enabled him to deliver awe-inspiring performances time and time again. When watching him in any of the roles he’s played, it’s not an actor that audiences see on the screen; his characters become actual, living people, with flaws and virtues so compellingly human they become as real as anything else. That quality is the mark of a truly great actor, and it is what has established DelHoyo as one of the most prominent figures in the highly competitive industry.

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